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My Mineral Collection, Systematic Inosilicates Page

These are my inosilicates. Inosilicates are chains of silicate tetrahedrons - either single-chain (SinO3n), double-chain (Si4O11 and Si8O22), or triple-chain (Si3O8) metasilicates. There are a lot of common inosilicates.
Inosilicates on Other Pages
Apachite, litidionite, plancheite, and shattuckite are on my copper minerals page.

Alamosite is on my lead minerals page.

Also, see tschermakite on my gemstones page.

Because it is now an unclassified silicate, denisovite is on my miscellaneous page.

Specimens on This Page
(links take you to either the first or only specimen)
Inosilicate Info
I've placed the spodumenes here because, though hard and transparent enough to be gemstones, their perfect cleavage and splintery fractures make them very difficult to cut; most faceters won't even try.

47 Rows

Actinolite

A miniature of dark-green actinolite needles in talc from the Liberty Lake Mine, Sykesville, Maryland.

Thanks to Keith Robertson's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Actinolite

A thumbnail of dark blue actinolite (an iron calcium magnesium hydroxysilicate) bundled fibers in matrix from the Del Puerto Canyon, near Patterson, Stanislaus County, California. Actinolite is usually considered to be the midmember of the tremolite-ferroactinolite series.

Thanks to Tom Lettier and Ken Balthazor's (The California Crystal Connection) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Actinolite,
var. Byssolite

Very fine fibers of actinolite (or tremolite) are called byssolite - this miniature from (probably the Keystone Trap Rock) Quarry, Cornog, Pennsylvania also has micro pyrites and some adularia.

Thanks to Dave Hayward at Lucky Strike Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Row 2

Actinolite,
var. Byssolite on
Chlorite on Prehnite

A miniature of fuzzy, matted byssolite on chlorite on prehnite from the Fairfax Quarry, Centreville, Fairfax County, Virginia. Neither the green chlorite nor the green prehnite shows up well - the larger picture (bottom) was taken under fluorescent lighting (only) to pick up the green prehnite.

Thanks to Wayne Bloechl's (GeoJoe's) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Actinolite,
var. Byssolite

A thumbnail of beautiful rust-colored byssolite fibers on matrix from the Keystone Trap Rock Quarry, Cornog, Penssylvania.

Thanks to Don Smoley's Minerals & Gems' table at the 2001 Carnegie Gem & Mineral Show for the specimen!

Actinolite,
var. Nephrite

Nephrite is the name given to massive compacted fibrous actinolite. It's also one of the two minerals called "jade" (jadeite's the other, rarer one). This beautiful 3½" slab comes from the Cassiar Mine near Provencher Lake in British Columbia, Canada. The larger image shows it backlit.

Thanks to Leland Goodwin's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 3

Aegirine

A thumbnail of aegirine (sodium iron metasilicate) from Mount Malosa, Zomba Malawi.

Aegirine

Small dark green aegirine needles cover a cluster of orthoclase crystals in the miniature also from Mount Malosa. I like to call this crabgrass aegirine!

Thanks to Tom & Vicki Loomis at Dakota Matrix Minerals for the specimen!

Aegirine

A lustrous black (the purple is a reflection) 5cm single aegirine crystal. The closeup shows the end view of this pyroxene from Mount Malosa.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen!

Row 4

Aegirine

Another aegirine crystal - this miniature from Mali, Africa, has a doubly-terminated smoky quartz crystal bisecting it.

Thanks to G. Stacy's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Aegirine
on Charoite

A beautiful miniature of radial aegirine on charoite from the type locality for charoite - the Murun Massif, Yakutsk, Russia.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen and the images!

Aegirine

Another beautiful aegirine radiating cluster, with eudialyte - this small cabinet's from Mount Kedykverpakhk, Lovozero Massif, Kola Peninsula, Murmanskaja Oblast', Russia.

Thanks to Spirifer Minerals auction on eBay for the specimen and images!

Row 5

Aegirine,
var. Acmite

Aegirine and acmite are generally synonymous, but I prefer to use acmite when referring to the sharply-terminated aegirines, as in this old (1935) miniature from Magnet Cove, Hot Spring County, Arkansas.

Thanks to Kim & Cindy Strange's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Aenigmatite

Aenigmatite (an iron sodium titanium silicate) almost shouldn't be an inosilicate - its chains branch left and right alternately at intervals. This miniature of lamellar aenigmatite comes from Mount Eveslogchorr, Khibiny Massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.

Thanks to Tony Nikischer at the Excalibur Mineral Company for the specimen!

Aerinite

Aerinite (from the Greek "blue sky") has only recently been recognized (1988) as a distinct mineral and this small cabinet specimen, as do most of them, comes from near the Estopiñán Dam in the Pyrenees Mountains, Huesca Province, Aragón, Spain. Aerinite is a historical pigment and aerinite inclusions create the beautiful "blue quartz" of Antequera, Málaga, Spain.

Thanks to Emilie & Ron Kendig's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 6

Anthophyllite

Anthophyllite's a rare magnesium asbestos - this miniature is from the old Pelham asbestos mine in Pelham, Massachusetts. It was collected by Eric Greene in 1987. Anthophyllite is dimorphous with cummingtonite and forms a series with ferro-anthophyllite, where iron replaces the magnesium.

Thanks to Eric Greene's (Treasure Mountain Mining) auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Anthophyllite, var.
Hermanov's Ball

At Hermanov in the Czech Republic, radial coatings of anthophyllite cover balls of phlogopite [small cabinet].

Thanks to Wayne Rudolph's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Arfvedsonite

Bladed arfvedsonite (a sodium ferrosoferric hydroxysilicate) intergrown with microcline from Mount Malosa, Zomba, Malawi, South Africa. This thumbnail is from the C. S. Queit collection. It forms a series with Magnesio-arfvedsonite, where magnesium replaces the ferrous iron.

Thanks to David H. Garske's (MINERALS and MORE) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 7

Arfvedsonite

This miniatute of black arfvedsonite cblades and gray quartz in albite comes from Hurricane Mountain in Conway, New Hampshire.

Thanks to Lee Rogers' auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Astrophyllite

The astrophyllite in this miniature from the Khibiny Mountains, Kola Peninsula, Murmansk Oblast, Russia looks like copper! Astrophyllite's a difficult mineral to classify in the silicate subgroups - some put it here, others put it with the phyllosilicates. It forms a series with kupletskite.

Thanks to Aksel Österlöf for the location update!

Augite

A classic small single crystal of augite - one of the pyroxene subfamily. I've had a bunch of these since I was a kid.

Row 8

Babingtonite

A miniature of black babingtonite (a calcium iron manganese hydroxysilicate) on quartz from Montecatini Quarry Baveno, Lake Maggiore, Piedmont, Italy. It forms a series with manganbabingtonite, where manganese predominates over iron.

Thanks to Chris Korpi at Pangaea Minerals for the specimen!

Babingtonite

Black wedge-shape babingtonite crystals in a pale green prehnite matrix from the classic locality of the Lane & Sons Traprock Quarries, Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts. Babingtonite is the Massachusetts state mineral.

Thanks to Veronica Matthew's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Thanks also to Eric Greene for the locale correction!

Babingtonite,
var. Barkevite

Most babingtonite crystals are somewhat equant - the more acicular habit is called barkevite. It only occurs in four places; Sweden, the Swiss Alps, the area of the Lucky "S" Gold Mine on Queen Mountain in Plumas County, California, and one known exposed dike in the Camptonite intrusive formations in the Suislaw National Forest near Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon, where this miniature of black barkevite, gray augite, and microcrystalline quartz is from. Note: This is not to be confused with barkevikite, the colloquial name for ferro-edenite.

Thanks to Leland Goodwin for the specimen!

Row 9

Barroisite

Barroisite's a double-chain magnesium aluminum calcium sodium iron silicate and forms at least partial series with Aluminobarroisite, Aluminoferrobarroisite, Ferribarroisite, Ferri-ferrobarroisite, Ferrobarroisite, and Ferroferribarroisite. This miniature of platy barroisite crystals on matrix is from Monte Beigua, Presso Albisola, Savona Province, Liguria, Italy.

Thanks to Helmut Braith's auction on eBay for the specimen and image!

Bavenite

A massive fibrous thumbnail of bavenite (a calcium beryllium hydroxyaluminosilicate) from the granite quarry at Striegau, Lower Silesia, Poland.

Thanks to David H. Garske's (MINERALS and MORE) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Bavenite

Bavenite also occurs in bladed colorless crystals, as in this (miniature) second of only two specimens found during a 1999 field trip to the Middle General Electric Quarry, Buckfield, Oxford County, Maine.

Thanks to Van King's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 10

Bustamite

A beautiful translucent miniature of massive bustamite (calcium manganese metasilicate) from Broken Hill, New South Wales, Australia. Bustamite's one of the many manganese silicates (a triple chain); it also has a bit (8%) of calcium and it forms an incomplete series with ferrobustamite.

Thanks to SoCal Nevada's auction on eBay for the specimen and images!

Carpholite

A carpholite miniature (from the Greek karphos - "straw" and lithos - "stone", a manganese aluminum hydroxysilicate) with a few very small light purple fluorites from the type locality of Schlaggenwald, Bohemia, Czech Republic. It forms a complete series with Ferrocarpholite and an incomplete one with Magnesiocarpholite.

Thanks to Tony Nikischer at the Excalibur Mineral Company for the specimen!

Crossite

Crossite's a fairly rare mineral (an iron magnesium sodium aluminum hydroxysilicate) - this miniature from Hallberg, Salzburg, Austria has two habits; most of the vein is massive, but there are a few clusters of acicular crystals (top right). Some references consider crossite to be a riebeckite-glaucophane intermediate.

Thanks to Chris Korpi at Pangaea Minerals for the specimen!

Row 11

Crossite

A thumbnail of crisscrossing crossite fibers in matrix from Skaggs Springs, Sonoma County, California.

Thanks to Tom Lettier and Ken Balthazor's (The California Crystal Connection) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Cummingtonite

A large miniature of radiating silky brown crystalline sprays of cummingtonite in schist-like matrix from West Chesterfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts (almost type locality material!).

Thanks to Tony Nikischer at the Excalibur Mineral Company for the specimen!

Diopside

A beautiful cluster of doubly-terminated, near gemmy, green diopside (calcium magnesium silicate) from Wilberforce, Ontairo, Canada. It forms a series with hedenbergite and johannsenite.

Thanks to Sharon Burnett's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 12

Diopside

Pale peach-colored diopside sprays from Fort Point, San Francisco, California.

Thanks to Tom Lettier and Ken Balthazor's (The California Crystal Connection) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Diopside

Dark green phlogopite mica decorates the top of this sage green diopside cluster from Dog Lake, Frontenac County, Ontario, Canada.

Thanks to Tom Klinepeter's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Diopside

Gemmy green diopside crystals on matrix comprise this miniature from Arondu, Basha Valley, Baltistan, Pakistan.

Thanks to Graeber & Himes' table at the 2001 Carnegie Gem & Mineral Show for the specimen!

Row 13

Diopside

A pretty miniature of blocky light green diopside on massive deep pink grossular from the famous Jeffrey Quarry, Asbestos, Quebec, Canada.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen!

Diopside

A miniature of pale green diopside on matrix from Eden Mills, Lamoille County, Vermont. There's also a little bit of amber vesuvianite (larger image, bottom) present.

Thanks to Frank Boone & Joseph Miller's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Diopside

A bright green 64mm single crystal of diopside (possibly chrome diopside) from an unknown location.

Row 14

Diopside

A beautiful miniature of glossy diopside and white calcite from Alta, Finnmark, Norway.

Thanks to Jan Garland's (Fine Rocks) auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Diopside, var. Chrome Diopside

A beautiful 17mm chrome diopside (the chromium-containing variety) crystal from Afghanistan.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen and the images!

Diopside, var. Chrome Diopside

A large cabinet specimen of chrome diopside crystals in a calcite matrix from Brazil.

Row 15

Diopside, var.
Schefferite

Schefferite is the name given to the manganese-containing diopside found at the varietal type locality of Långban, Filipstad, Värmland, Sweden. This miniature comprises brown schefferite in white hedyphane (a lead calcium chloroarsenate). Långban is also the type locality for hedyphane.

Thanks to Chris Auer's (Eureka Micromounts) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Diopside,
var. Violane

Diopside colored lavender by manganese is called violane (or violan) - this one's from historic Fort Point, San Francisco, California and is mixed in with the more normal green variety.

Thanks to Tom Lettier and Ken Balthazor's (The California Crystal Connection) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Donpeacorite

A miniature of brown donpeacorite (a manganese magnesium metasilicate) crystals in hexagonite from the co-type locality of the Vanderbilt General Mine, Balmat, Gouvernor, St Lawrence County, New York. It's dimorphou with kanoite.

Thanks to Val Collins' auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 16

Eckermannite

Dark-green elongated prisms of eckermannite (a magnesium sodium aluminum hydroxysilicate) in matrix from the type locality of Norra Kärr, Gränna, Småland, Sweden. It forms a series with Ferro-eckermannite, where iron replaces the magnesium.

Thanks to Tony Nikischer at the Excalibur Mineral Company for the specimen!

Edenite

This usually green member of the hornblende family is called edenite - these (large photo) are from the type locality, Edenville, Orange County, New York.

Thanks to Frank Yolton's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Edenite

A handsome small cabinet specimen of gray and bluish-gray edenite sprays from Mont Ibity, Antsirabe, Madagascar

Thanks to Tom Klinepeter's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 17

Elpidite

Most elpidite (a hydrated sodium zirconium silicate) specimens come from Mont St. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada. They're generally accompanied by many other minerals (as here) that are very hard to identify. I have two of them (larger image) and they're fascinating to look at under a magnifier!

Thanks to Brian McManus at the Pebble Peddler for the earlier specimen, (top row, larger picture) and Todd & Tammy Roen's auction on eBay for the newer specimen (bottom row, larger picture)!

Enstatite

This is a small piece of enstatite (magnesium metasilicate) that's clear enough to be facetable - it's from Morogoro, Uluguru Mountains, Tanzania, Africa. Enstatite's dimorphous with clinoenstatite and forms a series with ferrosilite, where iron replaces some of the magnesium.

Thanks to Mark Stevens' auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Epididymite

From the Winter 2003 find at Mont St. Hilaire, Québec, Canada, comes this esthetic epididymite (a sodium beryllium hydroxysilicate) thumbnail cluster on aegirine. It's dimorphic with eudidymite.

Thanks to Arnaldo Brunetti's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 18

Ferroactinolite

This cluster of ferroactinolite comes from Furtshagl, Zillertal, Tirol, Austria. It's the iron-rich end member of a series with tremolite, the magnesium-rich end member.

Thanks to Tom & Vicki Loomis at Dakota Matrix Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Ferroactinolite

A bright green miniature of parallel ferroactinolite fibers from an unknown location.

Thanks to Craig Hinegardner's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Ferrosilite

An excellent micro of reddish-brown ferrosilite (iron magnesium silicate) crystals in matrix (larger image, bottom) from the Monte Calvario Quarry, Biancavilla, Catania Province, Sicilia, Italy. It forms a series with enstatite and is dimorphic with clinoferrosilite. Ideally, ferrosilite should apply to the totally ferrous silicate endmember - hypersthene is commonly used for the iron-magnesium mixed silicate.

Thanks to Paolo Bracci's auction on eBay for the specimen and the photo!

Row 19

Fluoro-magnesiohastingsite

An excellent micro of reddish-brown fluoro-magnesiohastingsite (a complex iron calcium magnesium aluminosilicate) crystals on matrix from the type (and only) locality of a tachyandesite quarry near Deva, Aposei Mountains, Romania. This is an odd mineral - it doesn't form even an incomplete series with either magnesiohastingsite or hastingsite.

Thanks to Paolo Bracci's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Fluorrichterite

Fluorrichterite (or fluororichterite) is a rare calcium sodium magnesium silicate from near Wilberforce (Bancroft for this one), Ontario, Canada. As can be seen by the cross-sectional view, (larger image, third panel it's a member of the amphibole group. It's also the fluorine analog of richterite.

Thanks to Walter Mroch's (The Gem and Mineral Exploration Company) auction for the specimen and the image!

Foshagite

A miniature of matted fibrous foshagite (a triple-chain calcium hydroxysilicate) from the type locality of the Crestmore Quarries, Crestmore, Riverside County, California. It has a label from the Fred D'Esopo collection.

Thanks to Emilie & Ron Kendig's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 20

Foshagite

A bladed aggregate micro of foshagite, also from Crestmore. Foshagite is one of the materials used in a novel gas / liquid cylinder packing structure (US Patent #20080090035).

Thanks to Paolo Bracci's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Gedrite

A beautiful (for the species) large cabinet specimen of dark-green gedrite (a double-chain magnesium aluminum hydroxyaluminosilicate) stars in matrix from Skisshyttan, Västra Silvberg, Ludvika, Dalarna, Sweden. It forms a complete series with ferrogedrite, where iron replaces the magnesium.

Thanks to Jonas Bredberg's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Grunerite,
var. Amosite

Here's an excellent miniature of grunerite (a double-chain iron hydroxysilicate) sprays on hematite from the Michigamme Mine in Marquette County, Michigan. This gray-green fibrous variety is often called "amosite", especially in the asbestos literature, and is one of the nastier asbestoses. Grunerite forms a series with cummingtonite, where magnesium replaces the iron and is dimorphic with ferro-anthophyllite .

Thanks to Joe Vasichko's Rockmanjoe Minerals auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 21

Hastingsite

An excellent thumbnail of white hastingsite (a ferrosoferric calcium sodium hydroxysilicate) from the Cape Calamita Mine, Capoliveri, Elba Island, Livorno Province, Tuscany, Italy. It forms a complete series with magnesiohastingsite where magnesium replaces the Fe+2.

Thanks to Sue Silver's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Hedenbergite

Actually, the only hedenbergite (calcium iron metasilicate) here is included in the quartz crystals, giving them that dark green coloration. The quartz shares the small cabinet matrix with black blades of hematite. Hedenbergite forms two series, one with diopside and one with johannsenite. This small cabinet piece comes from Mega Horio, Serifos Island, Greece.

Thanks to Dan Wienrich at Dan & Jill Weinrich for the specimen!

Hedenbergite

Another specimen of hedenbergite - this miniature, with epidote after augite, comes from Tungsten Hills, Bishop, Inyo County, California.

Thanks to Chris Korpi at Pangaea Minerals for the specimen!

Row 22

Hilairite

A few transparent tan crystals of rare hilairite (a six-chain hydrated zirconium sodium silicate) on matrix from the type locality of Mont St. Hilaire, Québec, Canada. It forms three incomplete series; one with calciohilairite where calcium replaces the sodium, pyatenkoite-(Y), where titanium replaces the zirconium, and sazykinaite-(Y), where yttrium replaces part of the zirconium.

Thanks to Alexander Falster's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Høgtuvaite

A miniature of two exposed crystals of black høgtuvaite (a complex aluminoberyllosilicate) in matrix from the type locality of Høgtuva, Mo i Rana, Altermark, Nordland, Norway.

Thanks to Göran Axelsson's (Scandinavian Mineral Gallery) auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Holmquistite

Holmquistite's one of a series of double-chain lithium-bearing (magnesium aluminum) amphiboles and is dimorphous with clinoholmquistite and forms a series with ferroholmquistite where iron replaces the magnesium. This dark purplish-gray shimmery miniature (with small light blue translucent holmquistite, larger picture, right) is from the Foote Mine, Kings Mountain, Cleveland County, North Carolina.

Thanks to Ron Sloto's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 23

Holmquistite

In most of its locales, holmquistite is fairly nondescript, but in 2005 these specimens of dark-green holmquistite starbursts in light-colored matrix from China hit the market. This large-cabinet one is from arguably the type locality for these, the Koktokay Pegmatite field in Fuyun County, Aletai Prefecture, Xinjiang, China.

Thanks to the Astro Gallery of Gems auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Howieite

Glossy black blades of howieite, a double-chain complex iron hydroxysilicate, on matrix from the type locality of the Laytonville Quarry, five miles south of Laytonville in Mendocino County, California.

Thanks to Don Goodell's auction on eBay for the specimen and image!

Howlite

Howlite could be included with my gemstones because it's often dyed blue and used as imitation turquoise. It's named after Henry How, a Nova Scotian mineralogist - this piece, however, comes from California. Howlite used to be classified as a borate, now it's here as a (calcium) borosilicate.

Row 24

Hypersthene

Hypersthene's the middle member of the enstatite-ferrosilite series and is also dimorphous with clinohypersthene. This shimmery dark green miniature is from Mill Creek Canyon, San Bernardino County, California.

Hypersthene

This small cabinet specimen of very rare hypersthene crystals in quartzite is from Summit Rock, Klamath County, Oregon. Hypersthene is often considered ferroan enstatite. It's deaccessioned from the Virginia Tech collection.

Thanks to Keith & Patricia Wood's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Inesite

Inesite's one of the many manganese (with calcium) silicates - here, in this specimen from the famous Hale Creek Mine, Trinity County, California, it's occuring as pink needles.

Thanks to Dan Wienrich at Dan & Jill Weinrich for the specimen and the image!

Row 25

Inesite

More inesite - this one's from the famous Wessels Mine, Kuruman, South Africa. There are many pinacoidally-truncated apophyllites sprinkled on top.

Thanks to Chris Korpi at Pangaea Minerals for the specimen!

Inesite

An open cluster of inesite needles with hubeite from the Da Ye Mine (Dayan), Hubei, China.

Thanks to Miao Yang's eauction on eBay for the specimen!

Inesite with
Orlymanite

A small cabinet plate of inesite with brown botryoidal orlymanite (a hydrated manganese calcium hydroxy(phyllo)silicate), for which this is the type locality, from the Kalahari Manganese field, Wessel Mine, Kuruman, Northern Cape, Republic of South Africa.

Thanks to Debbie Woolf at Steiner's Rockshop's auction on eBay for the specimen and images!

Row 26

Johannsenite

A lawn of johannsenite (a calcium manganese silicate) studded with quartz and axinite from the Iron Cap Mine, Graham County, Arizona. I have a flat of thumbnails from there. It forms a series with diopside and hedenbergite.

Thanks to Brian McManus at the Pebble Peddler for the specimens!

Kaersutite

A small cabinet specimen of glossy black kaersutite (a complex magnesium titanium hydroxyaluminosilicate) crystal cleavages on matrix from approximately 10 miles east of Hoover Dam, Rt. 93 Road Cut, Mohave County, Arizona. It forms a series with Ferrokaersutite where iron replaces the magnesium.

Thanks to David H. Garske's (MINERALS and MORE) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Kosmochlor

This is a polished section of kosmochlor (cosmochlore, ureyite, or, in the jewelry trade, mawsitsit) in a chromite matrix from Tawmaw, Kachin State, Burma. It's a (chemically) simple sodium chromium pyroxene that wasn't discovered until 1963 (in a Mexican meteorite!) and has only recently hit the gemstone market.

Thanks to Tom & Vicki Loomis at Dakota Matrix Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Row 27

Kupletskite

Kupletskite is a rare and complex (manganese, iron, potassium, titanium, niobium, sodium) single-chain hydroxysilicate that occurs as golden-brown blades and fibers on matrix - this miniature is from Junguni Hill, Zombe, Balaka, Malawi. It forms series with both astrophyllite, Cesium-kupletskite, where cesium replaces some of the potassium, and Niobokupletskite, where the niobium content is greater than the titanium.

Thanks to Steve & Susan Bringe's (Summit Minerals) auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Lorenzenite

There are a bunch of brown lorenzenite (a rare sodium titanium silicate) crystals in matrix along with dozens of black hornblende needles from the Kola Pennisula in Russia.

Thanks to Chris Korpi at Pangaea Minerals for the specimen!

Lorenzenite

A gorgeous 1cm lorenzenite crystal in a miniature matrix from Flora Mountain, Lorozepo Massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.

Thanks to Darrel Merke's (Proton Minerals) auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Row 28

Magnesiocarpholite

A micro of rare magnesiocarpholite (an aluminum magnesium hydoxysilicate) from Corsaglia, Cuneo Province, Piedmont, Italy. It forms a complete series with ferrocarpholite.

Thanks to Csanad Loranth's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Magnesiohastingsite

A large, rich miniature of aggregted black magnesiohastingsite (a magnesium calcium iron aluminum sodium hydroxysilicate) from the Boston Mine in Orange County, New York - an uncommon locality for this mineral. It forms a complete series with hastingsite where Fe+2 replaces the magnesium.

Thanks to Tony Nikischer at the Excalibur Mineral Company for the specimen!

Magnesioriebeckite

A nice miniature of gray-blue magnesioriebeckite (an iron magnesium sodium double-chain hydroxysilicate) in matrix from the Gingel Brothers Quarry somewhere near the maryland border in Pennsylvania. It forms a complete series with riebeckite, where ferrous iron replaces the magnesium. The larger image (bottom) shows the silky luster.

Thanks to Vince Olsovsky's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 29

Manganogrunerite m

An excellent miniature of fibrous manganogrunerite (an iron manganese hydroxysilicate) from the Brunsjö Mine, Grythyttan, Hällefors, Västmanland, Sweden. The larger image (center, right) show the chatoyancy. Manganogrunerite used to be called dannemorite.

Thanks to Kristen Burgess' auction on eBay for the specimen!

Miserite

This nice miniature of pinkish-rose miserite (a complex potassium calcium double-chain silicate) with orange-fluorescing wollastonite (a single-chain calcium inosilicate) comes from the type locality of Potash Sulfur Springs, Garland County, Arkansas. Miserite is being considered as the basis for a series of synthetic high-strength high-toughness glass-ceramics. See the Rockhounding Arkansas article for more info.

Thanks to Charles Creekmur's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Namansilite and
Noélbensonite

These are two very rare manganese silicates - it's hard to see the difference in colors here, but the reddish-brown noélbensonite (larger image, bottom) is often an alteration product of the reddish-violet namansilite (larger image, center). The pectolite part of the white matrix glow bright orange under LUV. This thumbnail's from the Cerchiara (manganese) Mine, Liguria, Italy.

Thanks to Brian McManus at the Pebble Peddler for the specimen!

Row 30

Narsarsukite

Narsarsukite (a sodium titanium iron fluorosilicate) is named after Narsarsuk, Greenland - this one's from Mont St-Hilaire, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Thanks to Daniel Comtois at Daniel Comtois - Quebec Minerals for the specimen!

Narsarsukite

Another narsarsukite from the Poudrette Quarry in Mont Saint-Hilaire - this one's yellow.

Thanks to Tim Jokela, Jr. at Element 51 for the specimen!

Neptunite

Neptunite's a fairly rare and recent mineral - the best specimens, like this thumbnail on natrolite, come from the Benitoite Gem Mine, San Benito County, California. There are red glints from internal fractures and thin edges - also a few submillimeter crystals are bright red.

Thanks to Rob Kulakofsky at the Arizona Mineral Company for the specimen and the image!
Image copyrighted by the Arizona Mineral Company.

Row 31

Okenite

A beautiful okenite (calcium silicate) "puffball" from Pune, Maharastra, India.

Okenite

This okenite is from Pune, Maharastra, India and is accompanied by two white and one pale green gyrolites.

Thanks to the Carnegie Natural History Museum Store for the specimen!

Pargasite

Lime-green pargasite, a sodium calcium magnesium aluminum hydroxyaluminosilicate, (and probable dark green ferropargasite, where iron replaces the magnesium) comprise this small cabinet chunk from Timmins, Ontario, Canada.

Thanks to Ken & Liz Massie's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 32

Pargasite
&
Sanidine

Tiny black pargasite (larger image, bottom left) and colorless sanidine (larger image, bottom center) crystals in matrix from Mount Vesuvius, Italy, There's also a few unidentified transparent brown crystals present (larger image, bottom right).

Thanks to Dieter Obrecht's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Pectolite

Very nice white pectolite (sodium calcium hydroxysilicate) - the orange fluorescence under LUV tells me it's from Paterson, Passaic County, New Jersey. It forms a series with serandite.

Pectolite

A small cabinet specimen of a big blue-green pectolite spray in matrix from Berghamn, Kramfors, Ångermanland, Sweden. There's also some excellent dark-red piemontite crystals present.

Thanks to Jonas Bredberg's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Row 33

Pectolite
var. Lorimar

The blue copper-bearing variety of pectolite (discovered in 1974), when cabbed for jewelry, is called "Lorimar (Larimar)" - it only comes from the Filipinas Larimar Mine, Barahona Province, Dominican Republic.

Thanks to Thomas Bee's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Potassic-fluororichterite

A beautiful miniature of sharp purple-black potassic-fluororichterite crystals from the 2000 reworking of the Hunter Property, Tory Hill, Ontario, Canada. Some of the crystal edges (larger image, bottom right) are translucent.

Thanks to Darrel Merke's (Proton Minerals) auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Potassic-fluororichterite

A gemmy thumbnail light-yellow potassic-fluororichterite crystal from Kiran, Kokcha Valley, Badakhshan, Afghanistan. It's hard to believe that these two are the same mineral - though I'm told that slight compositional differences may account for the vastly different appearence.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Row 34

Pyroxmangite

Pyroxmangite's one of the many manganese silicates (manganese metasilicate) - this massive chunk is from the Sunnyside Mine, Eureka Mining District, Silverton, San Juan County, Colorado and has a few small quartz crystals on the back. It forms a series with pyroxferroite where iron replaces the manganese (and for which the type locality is Mare Tranquillitas, The Moon!).

Thanks to Henry Truebe's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Pyroxmangite

This thumbnail of pyroxmangite from Morro da Mina, Conselheiro Lafaiete, Minas Gerais, Brazil is a deeper rose pink than my massive one.

Thanks to Emilie & Ron Kendig's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Pyroxmangite

Another bright thumbnail of pyroxmangite from Morro da Mina - the closeup shows one of the gemmier portions.

Thanks to the Carnegie Natural History Museum Store for the specimen!

Row 35

Rhodonite

A pretty pink intergrown cluster of bladed rhodonite (another manganese silicate) from the Chiurucu Mine, Dos de Mayo Province, Huanuco Department, Perú. The closeup shows a bunch of clear, slender, doubly-terminated quartz crystals.

Thanks to Alan & Marsha Day at Mineral Exploration Services for the specimen!

Rhodonite

A massive chunk of raspberry rhodonite with a few crystal surfaces showing.

Rhodonite

Rhodonite embedded in galena with a spessartine on top from the Broken Hill Mine, New South Wales, Australia.

Thanks to Mike Shell for the specimen!

Row 36

Rhodonite

Massive rhodonite, especially if it has veins of manganese oxides, is often slabbed and polished for jewelry - this one's from an old mine (now a shopping mall parking lot) in Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Thanks to Donna Lee Hanlon's (Donna's Treasures) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Rhodonite, var.
Fowlerite

This miniature of fowlerite (xincoan rhodonite) dates from the 1950s and is from Franklin, Sussex County, New Jersey - the type locality for this variety. The larger image shows the front (top row) with a fowlerite crystal fragment in the fowlerite matrix - the back of the miniature (bottom row) shows the typical willemite / franklinite / fowlerite mix (and fluorescence) typical of the locale.

Thanks to Melissa Stewart's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Richterite

This sawn and sanded slab is primarily blue richterite (richtorite in the jewelry trade) - the midpoint (a sodium calcium magnesium hydroxysilicate) of the ferrorichterite and a hypothetical magnesiorichterite series. It's also the hydroxyl analog of flurorichterite.

Thanks to Craig Hinegardner's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 37

Riebeckite, var.
Crocidolite

The fibrous variety of riebeckite, a sodium iron hydroxysilicate, is called crocidolite (or "Cape Blue" asbestos - the more dangerous of the two asbestoses). When silicified it forms the tigereyes of jewelry fame - if it stays unoxidized through the silicification process, it becomes hawkseye; as it oxidizes, it becomes catseye (green), tigereye (yellow to red), and, finally, bullseye (brown). This beautiful shimmery cabinet piece comes from Kuruman, South Africa. It forms a complete series with magnesioriebeckite, where magnesium replaces some of the iron.

Thanks to Mike Keim at Marin Minerals for the specimen!

Riebeckite,
var. Pietersite

If, during crocidolite's silicification, the host rock is fractured and folded, it becomes pietersite, named after Sid Pieters, its discoverer. This gorgeous polished nugget is from Namibia. The Chinese pietersites are included with Like the tigereyes, pietersites are in demand for jewelry.

Thanks to Steiner's Rockshop auction on eBay for the specimen and images!

Riversideite

Like tobermorite, riversideite (a hydrated calcium hydroxysilicate) used to be classified with the phyllosilicates. Here, in this miniature from the type locality of the Crestmore Quarry, Riverside County, California, it occurs as white compacted fibers in veinlets throughout the matrix. There's also a partial crystal of the famous Crestmore sky-blue calcite (larger image, bottom).

Thanks to Vince's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 38

Santaclaraite

Santaclaraite's a hydrated manganese calcium hydroxysilicate - this miniature of pink santaclaraite in matrix comes from Mount Hamilton, near the type localities in Santa Clara County, California.

Thanks to Joseph & Catherine Morris' PhelansFinds auction on eBay for the specimen!

Sapphirine

Small dark blue crystals of sapphirine, a magnesium aluminum aluminosilicate named because of its resemblance to sapphire, from Androy, Madagascar.

Thanks to Dave Hayward at Lucky Strike Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Sérandite

A beautiful thumbnail of sérandite associated with black aegirine, silvery yellow polylithionite (bottom row, center, larger picture), white analcime (bottom row, left, larger picture), and manganous vesuvianite (bottom row, right, larger picture) from Mont St. Hilaire, Quebec, Canada. Its unique salmon-pink color comes from a partial replacement of the calcium in pectolite with manganese. The manganese also tinted the vesuvianite violet.

Thanks to Doug Miller at Northern Lights Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Row 36

Serendibite

A miniature of dark-blue serendibite (some altering to a brownish serpentine) and golden phlogopite in white (Grenville) marble from a now-closed watershed near Johnsburg Village, Johnsburg Township, Warren County, New York.

Thanks to Val Collins' auction on eBay for the specimen!

Shcherbakovite

An excellent miniature of brown shcherbakovite (a titanium potassium complex silicate) crystals on matrix from Eveslogtchorr, Chibiny, Kola Peninsula, Russia. It's the potassium-dominant analog of batisite.

Thanks to Sönke Stolze's Systematic-Minerals.com auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

 
Row 40

Spodumene,
var. Hiddenite

This pale green spodumene (hiddenite) is from Kunar Tal, Nuristan, Afghanistan. I'm not sure that this should be called "hiddenite" - the green tint is more likely due to iron rather than chromium.

Thanks to Greg Holland at the Stone Haven Mineral Shoppe for the specimen!

Spodumene,
var. Kunzite

Kunzite's the pink to lavender variety of spodumene - this one's from Gilgit, Afghanistan.

Thanks to Tom & Vicki Loomis at Dakota Matrix Minerals for the specimen!

Spodumene,
var. Kunzite

A miniature of the 2001 find of blue kunzite from Nuristan, Afghanistan. Like most blue kunzite, it'll probably turn lavender if left exposed to light and warm temperatures.

Thanks to S & F Gem's auction on eBay for the specimen and image!

Row 41

Spodumene,
var. Kunzite

A rare matrix miniature of kunzite - almost all spodumenes readily separate from their matrix. This one's from Pakistan.

Thanks to T. Laurano's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Spodumene,
var. Triphane

Spodumene (lithium aluminum silicate) can occur in many pastel colors - this yellow variety is also cvalled "triphane". I've had this for so long I don't recall where it's from.

Stokesite

Stokesite's one of the rare tin minerals (28% tin) - it's a calcium tin silicate named after Sir George G. Stokes, the famous British physicist and mathematician. This typical thumbnail of stokesite crystals on albite is from the Urucum Mine in Galilea, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Thanks to Don Smoley's Minerals & Gems table at the 2003 Carnegie Gem & Mineral Show for the specimen!

Row 42

Tirodite

Some references consider tirodite to be manganocummingtonite, a double-chain magnesium manganese hydroxysilicate. Most tirodite has a small amount of iron replacing the magnesium - if the iron content is more than 50%, the mineral becomes dannemorite. So, it's reasonable to consider tirodite as the midmember of a hypothetical manganocummingtonite - dannemorite series. This beautifully-fluorescing (red-orange tirodite and orange tremolite) miniature of transparent pink tirodite crystals in a tremolite matrix is from Talcville, St. Lawrence County, New York.

Thanks to Val Collin's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Tobermorite

Rare beige tobermorite (a calcium triple-chain hydroxysilicate) and blue calcite in matrix from the Crestmore Quarry in Riverside County, California. Tobermorite's dimorphic with clinotobermorite.

Thanks to Gary Lozonne at Lozonne's Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Tobermorite, var.
Crestmoreite

Once thought to be a mineral in its own right, crestmoreite is now considered to be a mixture of tobermorite and fluorellestadite (or any of the other ellestadite family members). This miniature of off-white crestmoreite in matrix (from the Harry Uhl Collection) is from the type locality of the Crestmore Concrete Plant, Riverside County, California.

Thanks to Jennings "Beau" Gordon's (Jendon Minerals) auction on eBay for the specimen!

Row 43

Tokkoite

A miniature of tokkoite (a calcium potassium triple-chain silicate) blades in matrix from the type locality of Murun, Jakutia, Siberia, Russia.

Thanks to Ingo Drescher's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Tremolite, var.
Chrome-Tremolite

This is a preform of the chromium-enhanced variety of tremolite - it's from one of the very few locales in the world, Balmat, St Lawrence County, New York and was mined in the 1950s.

Thanks to Mark Stevens' auction on eBay for the specimen!

Tremolite, var.
Hexagonite

Hexagonite's the pink to lilac manganese-rich variety of tremolite - most of it comes from Balmat, New York, either the Gouverneur Talc Corp. (this one) or the International Talc Company mines. There's two good-sized crystals here as well.

Thanks to Dave Hayward at Lucky Strike Minerals for the specimen and the image!

Row 44

Tremolite, var.
Hexagonite

Another (smaller) piece of hexagonite - this one's from the International Talc Company mine in Balmat, New York.

Tremolite, var.
Hexagonite

A thumbnail of hexagonite from Balmat, New York - this thumbnail has a gemmy crystal protruding from the massive matrix.

Thanks to Bill Kohout's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Vlasovite

Vlasovite's a rare sodium zirconium silicate with a complex structure - it's named after Kuzma Alekseevich Vlasov (1905 - 1964), the Russian mineralogist and geochemist. The green vlasovite is (as here) typically surrounded by white gittinsite (a calcium zirconium sorosilicate) - the matrix is deep pink eudialyte in this classic miniature from the Kipawa Complex, Sheffield Lake, Villedieu Township, Temiscamingue County, Quebec, Canada. There's a fairly gemmy vlasovite cleavage fragment present (larger image, bottom left).

Thanks to Darrel Merke's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Thanks also to John & Maryanne Fender (Fender Natural Resources) for the gittinsite identification and association info.

Row 45

Wollastonite

Pale bluish-green parallel wollastonite (a single-chain of three linked SiO4 tetrahedra - calcium metasilicate) blades with probable brown almandine and green diopside from the Minerals Unlimited Mine in Lewis, Essex County, New York. Wollastonite is one of a small group of minerals called pyroxenoids. I don't know what causes the blue-green tint - none of my field guides mention this color. As is often the case on my site, the actual color is somewhere in between Steve's photo and mine. It also glows a bright lime-green under longwave UV.

Thanks to Steve Cantiello's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Wollastonite

An excellent miniature of a group of wollastonite crystals on wollastonite matrix from Route 117, Mont-Tremblant, Les Laurentides RCM, Laurentides, Quebec, Canada. The larger image, rightmost panel, shows an end view of one of the crystals - an unusual habit for wollastonite.

Thanks to Alain Sankey's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Wollastonite

A more typical miniature of fibrous wollastonite from Mine Lac d'Amiante, Saint-Joseph-de-Coleraine, Les Appalaches RCM, Chaudiere-Appalaches, Quebec, Canada - the individual fibers shed easily.

Thanks to Alain Sankey's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 46

Wollastonite

A miniature of a section of wollastonite on yellow calcite, also from Mont-Tremblant - this has been analyzed to prove that these are wollastonites.

Thanks to Alain Sankey's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Wollastonite, var.
Parawollastonite

Parawollastonite is the common name for wollastonite-2M, the very rare monoclinic polymorph of wollastonite. This miniature is from the Crestmore Quarry, Riverside County, California. Ex: Larner R. Peak and David M. Shannon Collections.

Thanks to Kim & Cindy Strange's auction on eBay for the specimen!

Wollastonite, var.
Wollastonite-3A-4A-5A

A nice miniature of three rare triclinic polymorphs of wollastonite (3A, 4A, and 5A, now called 3T, 4T, and 5T) from the type locality of Kushiro, Hiroshima Prefecture, Honshu Island, Japan. I don't know what the black mineral or the iridescent schiller is (larger image, center).

Thanks to Thomas Bee's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Row 47

Wollastonite, var.
Wollastonite-2R

A nice micro of white wollastonite-2R on matrix from the type locality of the Fuka Mine, Bitchu-Cho, Okayama Prefectur, Chugoko Region, Honshu Island, Japan. I don't know where this fits into the complicated wollastonite polymorph scheme - I can't find any further information on this one.

Thanks to Dieter Obrecht's auction on eBay for the specimen and the images!

Xonotlite

A thumbnail of white xonotlite (a calcium triple-chain hydroxy(ino)silicate) from the Acheron River, Rakaia Gorge, Canterbury, South Island, New Zealand. Synthetic ceramics with a xonotlite structure (e.g., PROMALIGHT®-310) make extremely low thermal-conductivity microporous machinable insulators.

Thanks to Toby PAge's auction on eBay for the specimen and the image!

Zorite

A small miniature of tiny pink crystals of zorite (a titanium sodium triple-chain silicate) in a nepheline matrix from the type locality of the Yubileinaya (Jubilee) pegmatite, Mt. Karnasurt, Lovozero massif, Kola Peninsula, Russia.

Thanks to Tom & Vicki Loomis at Dakota Matrix Minerals for the specimen and the image!

maintained by: Alan Guisewite

Last Update 30 Jun 2013