SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 10, 2007
Students, faculty and staff of the School of Computer Science are invited to attend the Carnegie Medals of Philanthropy awards presentation at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17 at the Carnegie Music Hall in Pittsburgh.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 03, 2007
More than 60 women undergraduates will attend a first-of-its-kind conference focusing on computer science research opportunities for female students at Carnegie Mellon University October 5-7. The conference, "Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science" (OurCS), sponsored by Microsoft Research, will feature some of the world's leading female computer scientists as speakers. More significantly, OurCS is designed to have students doing actual research, working on research problems in teams guided by scientists from academia and industry.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday October 02, 2007
Early findings by Carnegie Mellon University researchers suggest that people who are suckered by a spoof email into visiting a counterfeit Web site are also people who are ready to learn their lesson about "phishing" attacks. Phishing attacks have become a common method for stealing personal identification information, such as bank account numbers and passwords.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 26, 2007
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center, have built a low-cost robotic device that enables any digital camera to produce breathtaking gigapixel (billions of pixels) panoramas, called GigaPans. The technology gives people a new way to make and share images of their environment. It is being used by students to document their communities and by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to make Civil War sites accessible on the Web.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 24, 2007
Anastasia Ailamaki, associate professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, is one of 20 scientists chosen for this year's highly selective European Young Investigator (EURYI) Awards. The EURYI program is designed to attract outstanding young scientists from around the world to create their own research teams at European research centers and includes five-year grants of 1 million to 1.25 million euros, comparable in monetary terms to the Nobel Prize. The recipients will be honored at a special ceremony Sept.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 24, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed an interactive, online game featuring a little fish named Phil that can teach people how to better recognize and avoid email "phishing" and other Internet scams. In testing at the Carnegie Mellon Usable Privacy and Security (CUPS) Laboratory, people who spent 15 minutes playing the Anti-Phishing Phil game were better able to identify fraudulent Web sites than people who spent the same amount of time reading anti-phishing tutorials or other online training materials. Now, the CUPS Lab wants to see how Anti-Phishing Phil perf
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 20, 2007
Researchers in the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science are building a robotic prospector for NASA that can creep over rocky slopes and then anchor itself as a stable platform for drilling deep into extraterrestrial soils. Called "Scarab," this four-wheeled robot will never leave the Earth.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 18, 2007
MEDIA EVENTEVENT:The Robotics Institute in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science will demonstrate a robotic prospector, "Scarab." The four-wheeled rover was built for NASA to test robotic technologies that could be used to find recoverable resources on the moon. Scarab is equipped with a Canadian-built drill that can obtain one-meter-long geologic cores for analysis. Scarab's novel suspension enables it to lower its belly to the ground for drilling operations.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 13, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University roboticist William "Red" Whittaker is assembling a team to land and operate a robot on the moon by 2012 with the intent of winning a $20 million challenge announced today by the X Prize Foundation and Google Inc. The Google Lunar X Prize, www.googlelunarxprize.org, is the richest international competition in history, with a total prize purse of $30 million. To win the grand prize of $20 million, a team must drive a robot for at least 500 meters on the lunar surface and transmit images to Earth.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 13, 2007
Michael Stilman, a PhD. student in the Robotics Institute's humanoid group, received an honorable mention and was one of three finalists for the first Robotdalen Scientific Award, an international award established by a Swedish research initiative to recognize and encourage young, innovative people in the field of robotics and automation.Mel Siegel, RI professor, was one of four jury members to select the winners.Eric Demeester of Katholieke Universiteit in Belgium received the Robotdalen Award and its 20,000-euro prize during a ceremony in Sweden Sept. 5.

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