SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 26, 2007
Takeo Kanade, Carnegie Mellon University's U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Computer Science and Robotics, has received the inaugural Azriel Rosenfeld Lifetime Achievement Award in Computer Vision "for his multiple and lasting contributions to the field."The award is named for the late Azriel Rosenfeld (1931-2004), a much-honored professor and director of the Center for Automation Research atthe University of Maryland.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday October 23, 2007
VICTORVILLE, Calif.— Carnegie Mellon University's Tartan Racing team, www.tartanracing.org, and Boss, its autonomous SUV, are ready for the next step in their drive to the DARPA Urban Challenge — the National Qualification Event (NQE) at the former George Air Force Base. "The technical challenges Boss will face in this event, run on urban streets and governed by the rules of the road, was beyond the capability of any robotic vehicle just a few years ago," said William "Red" Whittaker, the Tartan Racing team leader and a pioneering roboticist in Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Inst
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday October 18, 2007
Takeo Kanade, Carnegie Mellon University's U.A. and Helen Whitaker Professor of Computer Science and Robotics, is the 2007 recipient of the Okawa Prize, which is sponsored by the Japan-based Okawa Foundation for Information and Telecommunications. The prize pays tribute to and publicly recognizes people who have made outstanding international contributions to research, technological development and business in the information and telecommunications fields.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday October 16, 2007
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh, led by Pitt Psychology Professor Thomas Kamarck, are studying the effectiveness of a wrist-mounted instrument for measuring psychosocial stress exposure during the course of daily life.Kamarck and his colleagues have received a $426,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the first year of their four-year project, which is part of a larger NIH initiative to study environmental factors that people encounter every day that may increase their risk of certain diseases. The study will make use
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 10, 2007
Students, faculty and staff of the School of Computer Science are invited to attend the Carnegie Medals of Philanthropy awards presentation at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, October 17 at the Carnegie Music Hall in Pittsburgh.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 03, 2007
More than 60 women undergraduates will attend a first-of-its-kind conference focusing on computer science research opportunities for female students at Carnegie Mellon University October 5-7. The conference, "Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science" (OurCS), sponsored by Microsoft Research, will feature some of the world's leading female computer scientists as speakers. More significantly, OurCS is designed to have students doing actual research, working on research problems in teams guided by scientists from academia and industry.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday October 02, 2007
Early findings by Carnegie Mellon University researchers suggest that people who are suckered by a spoof email into visiting a counterfeit Web site are also people who are ready to learn their lesson about "phishing" attacks. Phishing attacks have become a common method for stealing personal identification information, such as bank account numbers and passwords.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 26, 2007
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with scientists at NASA's Ames Research Center, have built a low-cost robotic device that enables any digital camera to produce breathtaking gigapixel (billions of pixels) panoramas, called GigaPans. The technology gives people a new way to make and share images of their environment. It is being used by students to document their communities and by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to make Civil War sites accessible on the Web.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 24, 2007
Anastasia Ailamaki, associate professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, is one of 20 scientists chosen for this year's highly selective European Young Investigator (EURYI) Awards. The EURYI program is designed to attract outstanding young scientists from around the world to create their own research teams at European research centers and includes five-year grants of 1 million to 1.25 million euros, comparable in monetary terms to the Nobel Prize. The recipients will be honored at a special ceremony Sept.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 24, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed an interactive, online game featuring a little fish named Phil that can teach people how to better recognize and avoid email "phishing" and other Internet scams. In testing at the Carnegie Mellon Usable Privacy and Security (CUPS) Laboratory, people who spent 15 minutes playing the Anti-Phishing Phil game were better able to identify fraudulent Web sites than people who spent the same amount of time reading anti-phishing tutorials or other online training materials. Now, the CUPS Lab wants to see how Anti-Phishing Phil perf

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