Noah Smith

Third person biographical blurb

Noah Smith is Associate Professor of Language Technologies and Machine Learning in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. In fall 2015, he will join the University of Washington as Associate Professor of Computer Science & Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science, as a Hertz Foundation Fellow, from Johns Hopkins University in 2006 and his B.S. in Computer Science and B.A. in Linguistics from the University of Maryland in 2001. His research interests include statistical natural language processing, especially unsupervised methods, machine learning for structured data, and applications of natural language processing. His book, Linguistic Structure Prediction, covers many of these topics. He has served on the editorial board of the journals Computational Linguistics (2009–2011), Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (2011–present), and Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics (2012–present) and received a best paper award at the ACL 2009 conference. His research group, Noah's ARK, is currently supported by the NSF (including an NSF CAREER award), DARPA, IARPA, ARO, and gifts from Amazon and Google.

First person biographical blurb

I am Associate Professor of Language Technologies and Machine Learning in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. In fall 2015, I will join the University of Washington as Associate Professor of Computer Science & Engineering. I received my Ph.D. in Computer Science, as a Hertz Foundation Fellow, from Johns Hopkins University in 2006 and my B.S. in Computer Science and B.A. in Linguistics from the University of Maryland in 2001. My research interests include statistical natural language processing, especially unsupervised methods, machine learning for structured data, and applications of natural language processing. My book, Linguistic Structure Prediction, covers many of these topics. I have served on the editorial board of the journals Computational Linguistics (2009–2011), Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (2011–present), and Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics (2012–present) and received a best paper award at the ACL 2009 conference. My research group, Noah's ARK, is supported by the NSF (including an NSF CAREER award), DARPA, IARPA, ARO, and gifts from Amazon and Google.