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The Next Talk Sp'19 Talks General Info Speaking Req't

Software-optimized Systems in the Era of Hardware Specialization

Friday, May 3rd, 2019 from 12-1 pm in NSH 3305.

Anuj Kalia, CSD

In the post-Moore era, using specialized hardware tuned to specific applications is a promising direction to get higher performance. To create a cohesive specialization roadmap for the future, we must ask: how far can we go by optimizing software for existing hardware, and when must we turn to the more expensive option of deploying specialized hardware? I argue that for many important systems problems for which specialized hardware---intelligent NICs, FPGAs, programmable switches, and GPUs---has been proposed, software-optimized systems can provide competitive performance.

In this talk, I will focus on this optimization-specialization tradeoff in the context of distributed systems for modern datacenter networks. By using new techniques to better use existing CPUs and networks, my work invalidates the commonly-held belief that software-based networking cannot match datacenter network speeds, and allows building fast distributed systems that run entirely in software. I show that such designs have a fundamental latency advantage over distributed systems that use specialized hardware, whose limited flexibility often increases network round trips. I will describe in detail the design of eRPC, the first networking library to provide near-network performance in commodity datacenters. eRPC aligns with the end-to-end principle, and answers long-standing networking questions about reliability and congestion control.

In Partial Fulfillment of the Speaking Requirement


Spring 2019 Schedule
Mon, Jan 14 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Jan 18 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Jan 21 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Jan 25 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Jan 28 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Feb 1 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Feb 4 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Feb 8 GHC 6501 Ziqiang Feng Edge-based Discovery of Training Data for Machine Learning
Mon, Feb 11 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Feb 15 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Feb 18 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Feb 22 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Feb 25 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Mar 1 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Mar 4 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Mar 8 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Mar 11 GHC 6501 Spring Break Not Available
Fri, Mar 15 GHC 6501 Spring Break Not Available
Mon, Mar 18 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Mar 22 GHC 6501 Tiancheng Zhi Multispectral Imaging for Fine-Grained Recognition of Powders on Complex Backgrounds
Mon, Mar 25 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Mar 29 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Apr 1 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Apr 5 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Apr 8 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Apr 12 GHC 6501 Yanzhe Yang Motion Synthesis of Conversations for Background Characters
Mon, Apr 15 GHC 6501 Daehyeok Kim HyperLoop: NIC-Offloading for Faster Transactions in Multi-tenant Storage Systems
Fri, Apr 19 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Apr 22 GHC 6501 Expired
Fri, Apr 26 GHC 6501 Expired
Mon, Apr 29 GHC 6501 Jay Yoon Lee Gradient-based Inference for Networks with Output Constraints
Fri, May 3 NSH 3305 Anuj Kalia Software-optimized Systems in the Era of Hardware Specialization
Mon, May 6 GHC 6501 Vidya Narayanan 3D Machine Knitting
Fri, May 10 GHC 6501 Abutalib Aghayev Evolving Ext4 for Shingled Disks


General Info

The Student Seminar Series is an informal research seminar by and for SCS graduate students from noon to 1 pm on Mondays and Fridays. Lunch is provided by the Computer Science Department (personal thanks to Debbie Cavlovich!). At each meeting, a different student speaker will give an informal, 40-minute talk about his/her research, followed by questions/suggestions/brainstorming. We try to attract people with a diverse set of interests, and encourage speakers to present at a very general, accessible level.

So why are we doing this and why take part? In the best case scenario, this will lead to some interesting cross-disciplinary work among people in different fields and people may get some new ideas about their research. In the worst case scenario, a few people will practice their public speaking and the rest get together for a free lunch.


Guideline & Speaking Requirement Need-to-Know

Note: Step #1 below are applicable to all SSS speakers. You can schedule AT MOST THREE talks per semester.

SSS is an ideal forum for SCS students to give presentations that count toward fulfilling their speaking requirements. The specifics, though, vary with each department. For instance, students in CSD will need to be familiar with the notes in Section 8 of the Ph.D. document and follow the instructions outlined on the Speakers Club homepage. Roughly speaking, these are the steps:

  1. Schedule a talk with SSS by sending your name, department name, your talk title, talk abstract (including additional info like "Joint work with..." or "In Partial Fulfillment of the Speaking Requirement"), and a link to your home page to sss@cs at least TWO WEEKS before your scheduled talk.
  2. After you are confirmed with your SSS slot, go to the Speakers Club Calendar and schedule your talk at least THREE WEEKS in advance of the talk date.
  3. On the day of your talk, make sure you print Speakers Club evaluation forms for your evaluators to use.
Students outside of CSD will need to check with their respective departments regarding the procedure. As another example, ISRI students fulfill their speaking requirements by attending a semesterly Software Research Seminar and giving X number of presentations per school year. If you have experience with your department that might help others in your department, please feel free to contribute your knowledge by emailing us. Thank you!


SSS Coordinators

Qing Zheng, CSD

 


Web contact: sss+www@cs