Sunyoung Kim

Ph.D Candidate
Human-Computer Interaction Institute
School of Computing
Carnegie Mellon University
office: NSH 4617
email: sunyoung.kim@cs.cmu.edu
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Welcome!

I am a Ph.D candidate in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, advised by Eric Paulos and Jennifer Mankoff. My research interests lie in designing, building, and evaluating ubiquitous computing technologies that can promote positive changes towards everyday health, wellbeing, and environmental sustainability. Ultimately, my research efforts aim to enhance the quality of everyday life by appropriate adoption, design, and application of personal technology. I pursue it through the pursuit of human-computer interaction principles as well as collaborating with other disciplines, including information studies, art and design, and psychology.

I received my Master's degree in the Human-Computer Interaction program at Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008, advised by Gregory Abowd. During my stay at Georgia Institute of Technology, I a member of a member of Aware Home Research Initiative and the Ubiquitous Computing Research Group.

Before coming to Georgia Tech, I worked as an interaction designer in the fields of Internet Media, Ubiquitous computing, and Mobile Computing in Korea.

I am a recipient of IBM Graduate Ph.D. Fellowship 2011.

When I am not in front of my laptop working, I play tennis, practice yoga, and ride snowboard.
When I have a bit more time, I travel.

projects

My research interests lie in designing, building, and evaluating ubiquitous computing technologies that can promote positive changes towards everyday health, wellbeing, and environmental sustainability. My approach to this problem is to empower everyday people with novel, low-cost, personal technology to collect, understand, and take action on data for the quality of life. I design and study a range of techniques for collecting data such as building novel sensing systems, developing participatory data collection platforms, and utilizing crowdsourcing. My work also demonstrates broad thinking and execution of techniques for understanding and sense making of this data using not just visualization but form and context design elements. Finally, I evaluate and validate the persuasive potential of technical solutions for encouraging people to take action for a greener and better everyday life.

• Keywords: Ubiquitous computing, Mobile computing, Social computing, CSCW, Crowdsourcing, Citizen Science, Sustainability, Everyday health and wellbeing

Featured projects

  • SENSR
  • Creek Watch
  • inAir
  • wearAir
  • eWaste
  • buddyClock
  • Activity Tracker
  • Cybervillage

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  • WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing

    WearAir is an expressive T-shirt to sense the wearer’s surrounding air quality as indicated by the measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and publicly express those levels through visually expressive patterns. This work is designed to accurately measure and publicly express the immediately local air quality. Obtaining information regarding air quality indirectly from others might help people to increase their awareness to air quality.

    • Paulos, E., & Gross, M. D. (2010). WearAir: expressive t-shirts for air quality sensing. In Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction (pp. 295-296). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 34%]

    inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    Poor indoor air quality can contribute to the development of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, heart disease, and lung cancer. Complicating matters, poor air quality is extremely difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and existing sensing equipment is designed to be used by and provide data for scientists rather than everyday citizens. We designed inAir, a Tools for sharing, measuring, visualizing, and learning about indoor air quality. inAir provides historical and real-time visualizations of indoor air quality by measuring tiny hazardous airborne particles.

    Kim, S., Paulos, E. & Mankoff, J. (2013) inAir: a longitudinal study of indoor air quality measurements and visualizations, In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 2745-2754). ACM [Acceptance rate: 20%] Kim, S., & Paulos, E. (2010). InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 1861-1870). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 22%] Kim, S., & Paulos, E. (2009). inAir: measuring and visualizing indoor air quality. In Proceedings of the 11th international conference on Ubiquitous computing (pp. 81-84). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 12.9%]

    SENSR: a flexible framework for authoring mobile data-collection apps

    The proliferation of mobile and computing devices in everyday life has enriched our surroundings in terms of sensing and sharing, providing diverse channels to scientists for data collection, and creating tremendous opportunities for everyday people to engage in scientific projects. However, the difficulty of creating an appropriate application for mobile devices often hinders grassroots efforts. SENSR allows people without programming skills to easily build a mobile data collection tool and manage data among users.

    Website: http://www.sensr.org

    Kim, S., Mankoff, J., & Paulos, E. (2013). Sensr: evaluating a flexible framework for authoring mobile data-collection tools for citizen science. In Proceedings of the 2013 conference on Computer supported cooperative work (pp. 1453-1462). ACM. [Acceptance rate: 35.6%]

    Creek Watch: pairing usefulness and usability for successful citizen science

    The proliferation of mobile technology, and smartphones in particular, holds great promise for enhancing citizen science practices, as it provides a convenient means to capture and share data. However, current projects are still far from best facilitating mobile technology. One reason is the discrepancy between the usability and usefulness of a system: a simple system for novices often provides little value, while scientifically useful data is hard for non-experts to gather. To address this problem, we worked closely with state, local, and volunteer environmental groups, in conducting a series of HCI methods, including focus group and contextual inquiry, to determine their needs and requirements for lightweight environmental data collection activities. To that end, I implemented Creek Watch, a mobile application and webpage that enabled volunteers to report observation data of nearby waterways.

    Kim, S., Robson, C., Zimmerman, T., Pierce, J., & Haber, E. M. (2011). Creek watch: pairing usefulness and usability for successful citizen science. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 2125-2134). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 26%]

    BuddyClock: Sharing Portrayed Sleeping Status within a Social Network

    Within a group of peers, it is often useful or interesting to know whether someone in the group has gone to bed or whether they have awakened in the morning. This information, naturally integrated as a peripheral augmentation of an alarm clock, allows people to know whether it is appropriate to make a call or feel more connected with someone living remotely. BuddyClock is the design of an alarm clock, and the evaluation of how it enables users in a small social network to automatically share information about their sleeping behaviors with one another.

    Kim, S., Kientz, J. A., Patel, S. N., & Abowd, G. D. (2008). Are you sleeping?: sharing portrayed sleeping status within a social network. In Proceedings of the 2008 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work (pp. 619-628). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 23%]

    e-Waste: Practices in the Creative Reuse of e-Waste

    When e-waste is improperly discarded as trash, there are predictable negative impacts on the environmental and human health. This project explores ways to encourage people to creatively reuse e-waste. For that, we presented an accessible reuse framework that encourages creativity while maintaining personal ownership of e-waste. Through a series of online surveys of existing personal e-waste stockpiling behaviors combined with observational studies of existing reuse practices, we developed a design reuse vocabulary to enable wide ranging and creative reuse of obsolete electronics by everyday people.

    Kim, S., Paulos, E., & Gross, M. D. (2010). WearAir: expressive t-shirts for air quality sensing. In Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction (pp. 295-296). ACM. [Acceptance Rate: 34%]

    ActivityTracker: GPS Location Based Activity Tracker

    This application tracks and visualizes a user’s movement by GPS locations. Based on the speed, different icons are shown on the map to visualize different types of transportation a user used between walking and driving. Total distance, speed and calories burned are also shown on another screen. In the sharing mode, users in their social network are able to compare their walking distances and geographic locations for walking and driving. This shared visualization could help understanding everyday walking patterns and encourage walking.

    CyberVillage

    Cybervillage is a wireless home-network system installed at apartment complex in Korea for the first time in the world. A built-in tablet PC on the wall of each unit allows to control home appliances. My duty for this project was to create an interface for integrated wireless Internet service for tablet pic as well as mobile phones to ensure its usability, especially 1) Enhancing WIS Usability, 2) Creating integrated interface for WIS, and 3) Finding solution improving user-satisfaction

publications

* You can also find a list of my publications on Google Scholar and in the ACM Digital Library.

Peer-Reviewed Conference Papers Book Chapters Doctoral Consortium Extended Abstract Workshop Papers and Others

Curriculum Vitae

* You can also download a full version of my Curriculum Vitae here.

EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES HONORS & AWARDS

Sunyoung Kim

Ph.D Candidate
Human-Computer Interaction Institute
School of Computing
Carnegie Mellon University

© 2013 Sunyoung Kim