Course Syllabus


A. 8:30 - 8:50, 20 min  

  Introduction

    1. Overview of area and the course
    2. Acquiring 3D models from images
    3. Applications to computer graphics


B. 8:50 - 9:35, 45 min  

  Acquiring images (Curless and Seitz)

    1. Image formation
       - The lens law
       - Aberrations
    2. Media and Sensors
       - Film
       - CCD's
    3. Cameras as radiometric tools
    4. Camera calibration


C. 9:35 - 10:15, 40 min  

  Overview of passive vision techniques (Seitz)

    1. Cues for 3D inference (parallax, shading, focus, texture)
    2. Reconstruction techniques
       - Stereo
       - Structure from motion
       - Shape from shading 
       - Photometric stereo
       - Other approaches
    3. Strengths and Limitations

<> 10:15 - 10:30 Break

E. 11:20 - 12:00, 40 min  

  Voxel-based techniques for reconstruction (Seitz)

    1. Reconstructing discretized scenes from images
       - Complexity and computability
    2. Volume intersection
       - Shape from silhouettes
    3. Voxel coloring
       - Plane-sweep visibility
       - Reconstructing small objects and panoramic scenes
    4. Space carving
       - Toward 3D photorealistic walkthroughs
       - Ambiguities in scene reconstruction
       - Convergence properties
    5. Related approaches


D. 10:30 - 11:20, 50 min  

  Fašade: modeling architectural scenes (Debevec)

    1. Capabilities and Limitations of passive stereo
       - Immersion '94 project, Interval Research Corporation
    2. Constrained structure recovery
       - Architectural primitives
    3. Photogrammetry
       - Recovering camera parameters
       - Making use of user-interaction
    4. Refining structure with Model-based stereo
    5. Connections to image-based rendering
       - Impact of geometric accuracy on rendering quality
       - Local vs. global 3D models
       - Geometry's role in view interpolation, virtual environment
         construction, and reflectance recovery.


<> 12:00 - 1:30 Lunch 


F. 1:30 - 2:15, 45 min  

  Overview of active vision techniques (Curless)

    1. Imaging radar
       - Time of flight
       - Amplititude modulation
    2. Optical triangulation
       - Scanning with points and stripes
       - Spacetime analysis
    3. Interferometry
       - Moire
    4. Structured light applied to passive vision
       - Stereo
       - Depth from defocus
    5. Reflectance capture
       - From shape-directed lighting
       - Using additional lighting


G. 2:15 - 2:55, 40 min  

  Desktop 3D photography (Bouguet)

    1. Traditional scanning is expensive, but...
         desklamp + pencil = structured light
    2. Geometry of shadow scanning
       - Indoor: on the desktop
       - Outdoor: the sun as structured light
    3. Image processing: Spacetime analysis for better accuracies 
    4. Calibration issues
       - Camera calibration
       - Light source calibration
    5. Experimental results (indoor and outdoor)
    6. Error analysis and Real-time implementation


H. 2:55 - 3:35, 40 min  

  Shape and appearance from images and range data (Curless)

    1. Registration
    2. Reconstruction from point clouds
    3. Reconstruction from range images
       - Zippering
       - Volumetric merging
    4. Modeling appearance


<> 3:35 - 3:50 Break


I. 3:50 - 4:40, 50 min  

  Application: The Digital Michelangelo Project (Levoy)

    1. Goals
       - Capturing the shape and apperance of:
          - Michelangelo's sculptures
          - Renaissance architecture
    2. Motivation
       - Scholarly inquiry
       - Preservation through digital archiving
       - Virtual museums
       - High fidelity reproductions
    3. Design requirements
       - Geometry: from chisel marks to building facades 
       - Appearance: reflectance of wood, stone, marble
    4. Custom scanning hardware 
    5. Capturing appearance with high resolution photographs 


J. 4:40 - 5:00, 20 min  

  Discussion: 3D cameras and the future of photography (Everyone)

    1. What are the killer apps for 3D photography?
    2. When are passive vs. active techniques appropriate?
    3. How will consumer-grade technology influence 3D photography?
    4. Will 3D photography itself become a consumer product?

<> Adjourn