FacebookTwitterGoogle PlusRSS News Feed

SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 07, 2006
PITTSBURGH—The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a five-year, $11 million grant to researchers at three universities and five national laboratories to find new ways of managing the torrent of data that will be produced by the coming generation of supercomputers. The innovations developed by the new Petascale Data Storage Institute will enable U.S.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday August 31, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University will partner with General Motors Corp. to form Tartan Racing, a team that will enter a driverless Chevy Tahoe in the $2 million Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Urban Challenge scheduled for November 2007. The race will require autonomous vehicles to travel 60 miles of streets in a mock urban setting. To succeed, vehicles must drive completely on their own — without drivers or remote control — and finish the course within six hours.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday August 30, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Principal Systems Scientist Hagen Schempf and his team at the National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) in Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute are among 100 inventors this year who will receive R&D Magazine's prestigious "100 Award" for outstanding innovation. Schempf and his team are being recognized for designing, building and deploying Explorer™, the first remote-controlled, untethered, wireless, crawling robot that inspects underground natural gas distribution pipelines.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday August 09, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a new type of mobile robot that balances on a ball instead of legs or wheels. "Ballbot" is a self-contained, battery-operated, omnidirectional robot that balances dynamically on a single urethane-coated metal sphere. It weighs 95 pounds and is the approximate height and width of a person.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday August 08, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Educators at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Academy say robotics could become an even more powerful teaching tool with curriculum they developed for the new version of LEGO Education's popular MINDSTORMS robot-building set. The co-branded LEGO Education/Carnegie Mellon curriculum takes advantage of upgraded software and hardware, such as simplified programming and Bluetooth wireless capability, in the newly released MINDSTORMS Education NXT robotics set.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday August 03, 2006
PITTSBURGH—In just a few weeks, hundreds of programmers from all over the world who "virtually" converged on Pittsburgh in late July to decipher the mysterious "Monroeville Codex" will learn who was most successful. The codex is the key to a series of programming challenges created by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists as part of the 11th annual ACM SIGPLAN International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP), which sponsors the contest as part of their annual meeting.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday August 02, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has received a three year,$646,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop computational methods that willquickly identify key regions of the human genome that can be traced to prehistoric times. These regionscan then be used to reconstruct human genetic histories.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 17, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have been awarded a five-year, $15 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish an engineering research center that will develop technologies to help older adults and people with disabilities live independently and productively. Researchers at the new Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center (QoLT ERC) will create a scientific and engineering knowledge base enabling the development of intelligent systems that co-exist and work with people, particularly those with im
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 06, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist has demonstrated that you don't necessarily need to know much about poker to create a computer program that can play a winning hand of Texas Hold'Em. A knowledge of game theory, not the specialized expertise of a human poker player, is at the heart of the poker robot called GS1 developed by Tuomas Sandholm, director of Carnegie Mellon's Agent-Mediated Electronic Marketplaces Lab, and graduate student Andrew Gilpin.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 03, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science Professor Peter Lee has been named the university's new vice provost for research. Lee succeeds Duane Adams, who retired this past January after holding the post since 1996. Lee is internationally recognized as a leading figure in computer science research, particularly in areas related to the use of advanced language technology in the design, implementation and analysis of operating systems and networks. He is best known for co-developing the patented "proof-carrying code," a technology for ensuring the safety of mobile code.

Pages

Subscribe to SCS News