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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 14, 2006
The Human-Computer Interaction Institute's Bonnie John will face-off against some of the world's most unusable and mis-designed products in the Usability Game Show, hosted today by MAYA Design on the South Side to mark World Usability Day.John will be part of a team of experts that will critique lousy products and offer recommendations for improvement. A panel of celebrity judges, including fellow HCII professor Brad A. Myers, will then decide who wins.The contest will be from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the MAYA offices in the Southside Works, 2629 E.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday November 10, 2006
Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science is fielding two teams at tomorrow's regional competitions in the 31st ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest. The teams of three students each will pit their skills against others in the east central division at the University of Cincinnati. The competition calls for the students to use their programming skills to solve complex, real-world problems within a grueling five-hour deadline.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 06, 2006
The Heinz Endowments has awarded $400,000 to Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science to launch Project Olympus, a new initiative to chart exciting directions for the next generation of computing. The project, directed by Distinguished Career Professor of Computer Science Lenore Blum, is designed to bring the university's researchers together with innovators at major technology companies in the Pittsburgh area, such as Seagate, Google, Microsoft, Apple and Intel.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 06, 2006
An online tool developed by three Carnegie Mellon University graduate students could replace notes on the refrigerator door or faulty memories as a way for friends and roommates to keep track of shared expenses. Called Buxfer, the free, Web-based service enables users to quickly note expenses shared among a group or between members of a group.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday November 02, 2006
Carnegie Mellon University robots Grace and Quasi are slated to appear on ABC-TV's "Good Morning America" (GMA) beginning at 7 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 4. A key part of the program will be about how robots are changing our lives and how their impact will continue to grow in the future. Grace is a talking social robot that resides in the university's Robotics Institute (www.ri.cmu.edu). In 2002, she successfully completed the American Association for Artificial Intelligence's (AAAI) annual Robot Challenge.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday October 26, 2006
Three Carnegie Mellon scientists are members of an IBM-led consortium that is exploring advanced technology for secure wireless and sensor networks for U.S. and United Kingdom defense agencies.The newly formed International Technology Alliance (ITA) in Network and Information Sciences includes academic, industrial and government researchers from both sides of the Atlantic. The U.S.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 20, 2006
Robotics Institute Director Matt Mason and Mike Erdmann, professor of computer science and robotics, are principal investigators here for the Sensor Topology & Minimal Planning (SToMP) project, an $8 million multi-year study sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The goal of SToMP is to reduce the complexity of sensing and planning by using powerful mathematical tools developed in the field of topology. Topology is the science of abstraction: the process of casting away irrelevant details to focus on the essence of a problem.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 20, 2006
Join the staff of Intel Research Pittsburgh (IRP) and researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh, and UPMC as the Intel Lab hosts four distinguished lecturers and an open house highlighting results of its successful collaboration with the two universities and the medical center. See the progress of more than a dozen projects including "Diamond," a visualization system that can quickly sort through and compare thousands of images of skin lesions or mammograms to speed and improve cancer diagnosis.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 16, 2006
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a four-year, $1.1 million grant to six Carnegie Mellon researchers who will develop technologies enabling people to more effectively control privacy and security options available in mobile and pervasive computing environments that range from cell phones to smart offices.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 09, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, NASA's Ames Research Center and Google will be honored by the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif., for their work on the Global Connection Project, a joint software development effort that has helped rescue workers respond to natural disasters. The Tech Museum Awards, which recognize innovative uses of technology that help solve global challenges, will be presented during a Nov. 15 black-tie gala at the museum.

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