SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 28, 2008
The ACM's Special Interest Group on Algorithms and Computing Theory (SIGACT) will present the 2008 Gödel Prize for outstanding papers in theoretical computer science to Shang-Hua Teng, a 1991 ComputerScience PhD graduate, and Daniel A.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 21, 2008
A diverse crowd of soccer playing robots will demonstrate their capabilities and compete at the International RoboCup Federation's 2008 US Open RoboSoccer competition, hosted this year from May 24-27 by Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center. The public is invited to attend. The event, organized and chaired by Professor Manuela Veloso, of Carnegie Mellon University, and Professor Tucker Balch of the Georgia Institute of Technology, will feature soccer playing AIBOs, boxy, small-sized robots, microscopic nanobots and demonstrations of humanoids.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 14, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Most online game sites don't promise players anything besides some fun and a way to kill time, but a site being launched by scientists in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science will offer something else: a chance to make computers smarter.The new site, gwap.com, features what Luis von Ahn, an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department, calls "games with a purpose," or GWAPs.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Saturday May 10, 2008
Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute took center stage Friday night at the Carnegie Science Center's (CSC) 2008 Science Awards event. The Institute received the CSC's prestigious Chairman's Award, which recognizes organizations that bring economic growth to the western Pennsylvania region. The university's Entertainment Technology Center also was honored for contributions to information technology and Associate Physics Professor Tiziana Di Matteo was recognized as an emerging woman scientist. Robotics Institute Director Matt Mason accepted the award for the institute.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 09, 2008
A social robot being developed by Sara Kiesler and Jodi Forlizzi of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute and Paul Rybski of the Robotics Institute is one of eight Human-Robot Interaction RFP proposals selected by Microsoft External Research to share $500,000 in funding.When finished, Snackbot will roam the halls of Newell-Simon and Wean halls selling snacks. It is intended to bridge the gap between social robots that interact with people in a natural way— but often are immobile— and autonomous mobile robots that can move around but generally are not social.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 08, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Beginning this fall, Carnegie Mellon University will offer a Bachelor of ComputerScience and Arts (BCSA), a new interdisciplinary program that will equip students to explore and expand the connections between computation and the arts.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday May 05, 2008
Google Inc. has named Amy Hurst, a PhD student in human-computer interaction, and Jennifer Denise Tam, a PhD student in computer science, as 2008 Anita Borg Memorial Scholars. They are among 23 outstanding U.S. female leaders in technology who each will receive $10,000 scholarships through the program.Five other students in the School of Computer Science and one student from Electrical and Computer Engineering were recognized among 32 U.S. Anita Borg Finalists and will receive $1,000 scholarships.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 01, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's Lane Center for Computational Biology have discovered how to significantly speed up critical steps in an automated method for analyzing cell cultures and other biological specimens.The new technique, published online in the Journal of Machine Learning Research, http://jmlr.csail.mit.edu/, promises to enable higher accuracy analysis of the microscopic images produced by today's high-throughput biological screening methods, such as the ones used in drug discovery, and to help decipher the
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 29, 2008
Event: Outsourcing of information technology and business process services is a rapidly expanding and changing business phenomenon with worldwide revenues of $450 billion. A panel of industry insiders will provide an unusual opportunity to discuss this sometimes controversial and often misunderstood field and to detail how Carnegie Mellon University's Information Technology Services Qualification Services Center (ITSqc) is helping to improve relations between service providers and their clients.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 28, 2008
John Grasso, director of strategic development and distance education for the Institute for Software Research, has been honored with the Suzhou Science and Technology Prize. It is presented by the government of Suzhou, a fast-growing city west of Shanghai in the People's Republic of China. The award recognizes Grasso for his work since 2004 advising the city's software industry on the use of internationally recognized methods of training and organizational process improvement created by Carnegie Mellon and its Software Engineering Institute.

Pages

Subscribe to SCS News