SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 24, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Madeira in Portugal will launch a joint program this fall for a dual master's degree in human-computer interaction that will involve course work on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. The 16-month program is sponsored by the regional government of Madeira. It will include a semester of core courses at Carnegie Mellon's Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) in the fall, followed by 12 months of further course work and a capstone project course at the University of Madeira.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 24, 2007
David O'Hallaron, associate professor of computer science and electrical and computer engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, is the new director of Intel Research Pittsburgh. O'Hallaron, whose research focuses on scientific supercomputing, computational database systems and virtualization, assumed leadership of the Pittsburgh lab July 1. He succeeds Todd Mowry, who has returned to the university as an associate professor of computer science. Founded in 2002, Intel Research Pittsburgh is one of three labs Intel Corp.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 16, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University is hosting three high school students from the Al RU'YA Bilingual School in Kuwait who took the top spot at Carnegie Mellon in Qatar's first international Botball® competition. The students won a trip to Pittsburgh as the grand prize after beating 17 other teams from Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait in May. The students and their teacher will spend five days in Pittsburgh.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 10, 2007
Computer graphics researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed systems for editing or altering photographs using segments of the millions of images available on the Web. Whether adding people or objects to a photo, or filling holes in an edited photo, the systems automatically find images that match the context of the original photo so they blend realistically.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 10, 2007
Once again, Carnegie Mellon University's teams of soccer-playing robots have taken top spots at the International RoboCup Federation's 2007 RoboCup competition, which ended Sunday in Atlanta. The CMDragons are world champions in the small-sized robot league for the second consecutive year after besting a dozen competitors. The CMDash AIBO team took third place in the legged league, which included a field of 24.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 02, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University is fielding two teams of autonomous, soccer playing robots and a rescue robot simulation at RoboCup 2007, the International RoboCup Federation's annual competition, which takes place July 1-10 at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Teams from all over the world will compete in a number of leagues, including the four-legged AIBO league, small and mid-sized robot leagues humanoid, robot rescue, and robots at home leagues, as well as various simulations.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 25, 2007
Jonathan Aldrich, assistant professor in the Institute for Software Research (ISR) in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, will receive the 2007 AITO Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize for his groundbreaking work in object-oriented programming, the dominant programming paradigm in industry.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Sunday June 17, 2007
A 360-degree panoramic imaging system for still and video photography developed by Carnegie Mellon researchers is helping security officials keep an eye on all kinds action at the U.S.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 13, 2007
EVENT: Tartan Racing's self-driving SUV, named Boss, will demonstrate its street savvy during a site visit and inspection by representatives of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Tartan Racing is one of 53 teams contending for a spot in DARPA's Urban Challenge, a Nov. 3 race that will pit autonomous vehicles against each other on a course that simulates an urban driving environment. The top prize is $2 million.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 11, 2007
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new computerized method for matching living kidney donors with kidney disease patients that can increase the number of kidney transplants — and save lives. This step-by-step method, or algorithm, could significantly boost the efficiency of kidney exchanges, a mechanism for matching live donors with unrelated recipients. Kidney exchanges are now considered the best chance for boosting the number of kidney transplants in the United States.

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