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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday August 08, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Educators at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Academy say robotics could become an even more powerful teaching tool with curriculum they developed for the new version of LEGO Education's popular MINDSTORMS robot-building set. The co-branded LEGO Education/Carnegie Mellon curriculum takes advantage of upgraded software and hardware, such as simplified programming and Bluetooth wireless capability, in the newly released MINDSTORMS Education NXT robotics set.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday August 03, 2006
PITTSBURGH—In just a few weeks, hundreds of programmers from all over the world who "virtually" converged on Pittsburgh in late July to decipher the mysterious "Monroeville Codex" will learn who was most successful. The codex is the key to a series of programming challenges created by Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists as part of the 11th annual ACM SIGPLAN International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP), which sponsors the contest as part of their annual meeting.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday August 02, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has received a three year,$646,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop computational methods that willquickly identify key regions of the human genome that can be traced to prehistoric times. These regionscan then be used to reconstruct human genetic histories.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 17, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) have been awarded a five-year, $15 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish an engineering research center that will develop technologies to help older adults and people with disabilities live independently and productively. Researchers at the new Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center (QoLT ERC) will create a scientific and engineering knowledge base enabling the development of intelligent systems that co-exist and work with people, particularly those with im
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 06, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist has demonstrated that you don't necessarily need to know much about poker to create a computer program that can play a winning hand of Texas Hold'Em. A knowledge of game theory, not the specialized expertise of a human poker player, is at the heart of the poker robot called GS1 developed by Tuomas Sandholm, director of Carnegie Mellon's Agent-Mediated Electronic Marketplaces Lab, and graduate student Andrew Gilpin.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 03, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science Professor Peter Lee has been named the university's new vice provost for research. Lee succeeds Duane Adams, who retired this past January after holding the post since 1996. Lee is internationally recognized as a leading figure in computer science research, particularly in areas related to the use of advanced language technology in the design, implementation and analysis of operating systems and networks. He is best known for co-developing the patented "proof-carrying code," a technology for ensuring the safety of mobile code.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 20, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute are creating the new Center for Innovative Robotics, a resource that will help make robotics accessible to a broader range of individuals and businesses. "One of the goals of the center will be to promote interoperability between many types of robots and a variety of software, including use of the Internet for controlling robots," said Illah Nourbakhsh, associate professor of robotics and director of the new center. "Innovation in robotics is difficult today because the software development costs a
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 20, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A small, wheeled robot designed and built at Carnegie Mellon University powered the school's robot soccer team, CMDragons'06, to victory Sunday in the small robot league at the RoboCup 2006 World Championship in Bremen, Germany. The team's five robots, cube-shaped machines with 7-inch sides, outscored opponents by a combined 53-3 margin in the six games played at the international competition.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 14, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A robotic pet, an industrial robot and three robot stars of classic movies will be inducted into Carnegie Mellon University's Robot Hall of Fame® in a June 21 ceremony at the Sheraton Station Square in Pittsburgh. Actor Anthony Daniels, who played the robot C-3PO in all six "Star Wars" films, returns as master of ceremonies and Daniel H.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 13, 2006
PITTSBURGH— Gazing at a snapshot from a family picnic, you recognize instantly that the tuft of leaves hanging over Uncle John is not part of a tree growing out the top of his head. Any fool can see he is standing in front of the tree. Perceiving a three-dimensional world in a two-dimensional image is something humans take for granted, but it's something that has long flummoxed computer vision systems.

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