SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 01, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's Lane Center for Computational Biology have discovered how to significantly speed up critical steps in an automated method for analyzing cell cultures and other biological specimens.The new technique, published online in the Journal of Machine Learning Research, http://jmlr.csail.mit.edu/, promises to enable higher accuracy analysis of the microscopic images produced by today's high-throughput biological screening methods, such as the ones used in drug discovery, and to help decipher the
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 29, 2008
Event: Outsourcing of information technology and business process services is a rapidly expanding and changing business phenomenon with worldwide revenues of $450 billion. A panel of industry insiders will provide an unusual opportunity to discuss this sometimes controversial and often misunderstood field and to detail how Carnegie Mellon University's Information Technology Services Qualification Services Center (ITSqc) is helping to improve relations between service providers and their clients.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 28, 2008
John Grasso, director of strategic development and distance education for the Institute for Software Research, has been honored with the Suzhou Science and Technology Prize. It is presented by the government of Suzhou, a fast-growing city west of Shanghai in the People's Republic of China. The award recognizes Grasso for his work since 2004 advising the city's software industry on the use of internationally recognized methods of training and organizational process improvement created by Carnegie Mellon and its Software Engineering Institute.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday April 25, 2008
The May issue of Condé Nast Portfolio names Tuomas Sandholm, professor of computer science, as one of the three most influential academics in the business world— and features Wean Hall 7500 in a slightly surreal photo illustration. The new business publication's first Brilliant Issue showcases 73 people the editors say are changing the way business is done today.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 24, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Citing the critical importance of the continued growth of robotics to U.S. competitiveness, 11 universities are taking the lead in developing an integrated national strategy for robotics research. The United States is the only nation engaged in advanced robotics research that does not have such a research roadmap. The Computing Community Consortium (CCC), a program of the National Science Foundation, is providing support for developing the roadmap, which will be a unified research agenda for robotics across federal agencies, industry and the universities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 21, 2008
PITTSBURGH-Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos will be the guest speaker at Carnegie Mellon University diploma ceremonies for its Tepper School of Business and School of Computer Science during the university's commencement weekend, May 17-18. Bezos will speak to business school graduates receiving master's and doctor's degrees at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 17 at Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall, 4141 Fifth Avenue in Oakland. He will receive an honorary doctorate in science and technology during the 11 a.m. university-wide commencement ceremony on Sunday, May 18.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 16, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Three Carnegie Mellon University students have received Barry M. GoldwaterScholarships to encourage their pursuit of careers in the natural sciences. Andrew David DeYoung,Lawrence D. Jesper and Samuel M. Kim are three of 321 sophomores and juniors nationwide chosen frommore than 1,000 nominations to receive scholarships this year.Colleges and universities can submit up to four nominations annually for these awards, and all ofCarnegie Mellon's nominees were recognized.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 16, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Edmund M. Clarke, professor of computer science and winner of the 2007 A.M. Turing Award, has been named a University Professor, the highest rank Carnegie Mellon University confers upon its faculty. Clarke is known for his pioneering work on Model Checking, an automated method for finding design errors in computer hardware and software.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 15, 2008
The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has announced its 2008 research grants, which include a grant named in honor of Randy Pausch. He has helped the group lobby Congress for increased funding for pancreatic cancer research.Nabeel Bardeesy of Massachusetts General Hospital is the first recipient of the Randy Pausch, PhD Pilot Grant. The two-year, $100,000 grant will support her research project, "Molecular Markers of Drug Sensitivity in Pancreatic Cancer." "We are excited to announce the 2008 Research Grant Awards recipients and honor our dear friend, Dr.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday April 11, 2008
PITTSBURGH—When Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science Professor Randy Pausch gave his famous last lecture on Sept. 18, 2007, Wall Street Journal reporter and Carnegie Mellon alumnus Jeffrey Zaslow (H&SS '80) was in the audience. The stories he wrote in his column Moving On, catapulted the terminally ill Pausch into an Internet phenomenon and international celebrity. According to Zaslow, the lecture video was the most watched in WSJ.com history. And the story was most read and most e-mailed for weeks.

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