SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 10, 2007
Computer graphics researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed systems for editing or altering photographs using segments of the millions of images available on the Web. Whether adding people or objects to a photo, or filling holes in an edited photo, the systems automatically find images that match the context of the original photo so they blend realistically.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday July 10, 2007
Once again, Carnegie Mellon University's teams of soccer-playing robots have taken top spots at the International RoboCup Federation's 2007 RoboCup competition, which ended Sunday in Atlanta. The CMDragons are world champions in the small-sized robot league for the second consecutive year after besting a dozen competitors. The CMDash AIBO team took third place in the legged league, which included a field of 24.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 02, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University is fielding two teams of autonomous, soccer playing robots and a rescue robot simulation at RoboCup 2007, the International RoboCup Federation's annual competition, which takes place July 1-10 at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Teams from all over the world will compete in a number of leagues, including the four-legged AIBO league, small and mid-sized robot leagues humanoid, robot rescue, and robots at home leagues, as well as various simulations.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 25, 2007
Jonathan Aldrich, assistant professor in the Institute for Software Research (ISR) in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, will receive the 2007 AITO Dahl-Nygaard Junior Prize for his groundbreaking work in object-oriented programming, the dominant programming paradigm in industry.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Sunday June 17, 2007
A 360-degree panoramic imaging system for still and video photography developed by Carnegie Mellon researchers is helping security officials keep an eye on all kinds action at the U.S.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 13, 2007
EVENT: Tartan Racing's self-driving SUV, named Boss, will demonstrate its street savvy during a site visit and inspection by representatives of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Tartan Racing is one of 53 teams contending for a spot in DARPA's Urban Challenge, a Nov. 3 race that will pit autonomous vehicles against each other on a course that simulates an urban driving environment. The top prize is $2 million.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 11, 2007
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new computerized method for matching living kidney donors with kidney disease patients that can increase the number of kidney transplants — and save lives. This step-by-step method, or algorithm, could significantly boost the efficiency of kidney exchanges, a mechanism for matching live donors with unrelated recipients. Kidney exchanges are now considered the best chance for boosting the number of kidney transplants in the United States.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday June 08, 2007
Pamela Jennings, assistant professor in the School of Computer Science's Human-Computer Interaction Institute and the School of Art in the College of Fine Arts, is the curator of a digital media art exhibition being held at the headquarters of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington D.C. The exhibition is part of the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM Creativity and Cognition Conference, which takes place in Washington June 13-15, 2007.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 06, 2007
People are willing to pay extra to buy items from online retailers when they can easily ascertain how retailers' policies will protect their privacy, a new Carnegie Mellon University study shows. Participants in the laboratory study used a Carnegie Mellon shopping search engine called Privacy Finder, www.privacyfinder.org, which can automatically evaluate a Web site's privacy policies and display the results on the search results page.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 05, 2007
Randal E. Bryant, University Professor and dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, is the 2007 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) Emanuel R. Piore Award. Bryant received the award in recognition of his seminal contributions to the simulation and verification of electronic systems. The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. Its Emanuel R. Piore Award recognizes outstanding contributions in the field of information processing as they relate to computer science.

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