SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday January 29, 2009
As anyone who knew Randy Pausch or heard his "Last Lecture" could tell you, playing in the National Football League was one of his childhood dreams. He never achieved pro status, but he put the lessons he learned on the football field to great use throughout his life and career. With a Steelers appearance in Super Bowl XLIII, the NFL is making great use of Pausch's inspiring words.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday January 23, 2009
More than a thousand video game enthusiasts scattered across 14 time zones, including a contingent at Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center, will spend 48 hours building games as part of the first Global Game Jam, January 30 through February 1.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday January 22, 2009
"Winds of Orbis"an exercise-centered video game developed by a graduate student team at the Entertainment Technology Center is one of 10 finalists in the Student Showcase competition at this year's Independent Games Festival (IGF). The action-adventure video game combines the Nintendo Wii Remote and Nunchuk with a Dance Pad, enabling players to use their whole bodies as they battle onscreen enemies and avoid virtual obstacles.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday January 15, 2009
The Association for Computing Machinery has recognized Tuomas Sandholm, professor of computer science, as one of 44 new ACM Fellows. Sandholm, director of the Agent-Mediated Electronic Marketplaces Laboratory, was cited for his contributions to combinatorial auctions and mechanism design.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 12, 2009
A Carnegie Mellon University team of experts in computational biology and machine learning is among four finalists in the inaugural Elsevier Grand Challenge on Knowledge Enhancement in the Life Sciences, a contest designed to encourage development of tools dealing with the ever increasing amount of online life sciences information.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday January 06, 2009
The Times of London's "TimesOnline" reports that their story on Carnegie Mellon University's Gigapan CameraSystem was the most widely read among the top 50 technology stories theycovered in 2008. TheGigaPan story beat out articles on the large hadron collider, invisibilitydevices, and the Indian Space Agency's newly developed rival to Google Earth.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 05, 2009
Research by TomMitchell, chair of the Machine Learning Department, and Marcel Just, professorof psychology, on the use of brain scans to identify thoughts was featured on theJan. 4 episode of CBS News' "60 Minutes." The computer algorithms developed byMitchell and Just have provided new insight into how the brain encodes meaning.See correspondent Lesley Stahl's report.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 23, 2008
Alice 3 Workshop Draws Educators from Across the Nation
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday December 22, 2008
In a new podcast,Jennifer Mankoff, associate professor in the Human-Computer InteractionInstitute, discusses how computer scientists can help reduce energy use andaddress global climate change. Stepgreen,a Web site being developed by Mankoff and her colleagues, is providing peoplewith advice and motivation for reducing their carbon footprint.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday December 19, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Four Carnegie Mellon University faculty members have been awarded the distinction of Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 486 members have been awarded this honor in recognition of their distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

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