SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 07, 2008
Carnegie Mellon Tartan Racing's Boss is in Vegas this week for the giant Consumer Electronics Show and has been garnering attention from the thousands of reporters who annual descend on the show. Viewers of NBC's Today Show on Monday saw weatherman Al Roker climb into Boss' passenger seat, punch a large green button and go for a ride around a parking lot.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 07, 2008
A team of U.S., Israeli and German scientists used computational biology techniques to discover 480 genes that play a role in human cell division and to identify more than 100 of those genes that have an abnormal pattern of activation in cancer cells. Malignant cells have lost control of the replication process, so detecting differences in cell cycle gene activation in normal and malignant cells provides important clues about how cancers develop, said Ziv Bar-Joseph, a Carnegie Mellon University computational biologist who led the study.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday January 02, 2008
A team of Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists and cognitive neuroscientists, combining methods of machine learning and brain imaging, have found a way to identify where people's thoughts and perceptions of familiar objects originate in the brain by identifying the patterns of brain activity associated with the objects. An article in the Jan. 2 issue of PLoS One discusses this new method, which was developed over two years under the leadership of neuroscientist Professor Marcel Just and Computer Science Professor Tom M.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday December 12, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University is looking for high school students whose interests in language, math and computers could make them top competitors in the second annual North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad. The university is one of about a dozen schools nationwide that will host an open round of competition Feb. 5. Competitors will take a pencil-and-paper test. Those scoring in the top 25 percent will return for an invitational round on March 11. Winners of the invitational round will be eligible to compete in the International Linguistics Olympiad this summer in Bulgaria.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday December 07, 2007
Randy Pausch, professor of computer science in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, has won the 2007 Karl V. Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award from the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). The award recognizes his innovative efforts to teach computer science in ways that are accessible and fun. Pausch is the first Carnegie Mellon professor to receive the highly competitive Karlstrom Award, which includes a $5,000 prize.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday November 29, 2007
For more than 10 years, the raucous stage show that marks semester's end for the "Building Virtual Worlds" class has been a campus phenomenon. The latest version will premier at 6 p.m. Wednesday Dec. 5 in McConomy Auditorium. The often hilarious, colorful and exhilarating show allows students in the interdisciplinary project course to show off their best work to a standing room only audience. Lines form early with seating on a first-come, first-served basis, though overflow seating for 100 will be available in the Rangos 3 ballroom.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday November 29, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University's National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC), part of the Robotics Institute in the School of Computer Science, has won a $14.4 million contract to develop an advanced, autonomous, unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) for the US Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC). The TARDEC contract funds NREC to build an updated version of the center's successful "Crusher" UGV as part of the Autonomous Platform Demonstrator (APD) program.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 27, 2007
The Million Book Project, an international venture led by Carnegie Mellon University in the United States, Zhejiang University in China, the Indian Institute of Science in India and the Library at Alexandria in Egypt, has completed the digitization of more than 1.5 million books, which are now available online. For the first time since the project was initiated in 2002, all of the books, which range from Mark Twain's "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" to "The Analects of Confucius," are available through a single Web portal of the Universal Library (
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 27, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute will host the seventh annual IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots, Nov. 29-Dec. 1 at the Omni William Penn Hotel downtown. The conference is sponsored by the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers Robotics and Automation Society. Highlights will include tours of the Robotics Institute on the Carnegie Mellon campus from 2 to 4 p.m., and 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., Thursday, Nov.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 19, 2007
Being among the first to pick up on Internet news and gossip and rapidly detecting contamination anywhere in a water supply system are similar problems, at least from a computer scientist's point of view.

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