SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 08, 2008
Jeannette M. Wing, President's Professor of Computer Science, washonored Wednesday, October 08, 2008, by Gov. Ed Rendell and First LadyJudge Marjorie O. Rendell as one of seven Distinguished Daughters ofPennsylvania during a luncheon at the Governor's Residence inHarrisburg.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 29, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's Entertainment Technology Center (ETC) Press debuts the publication of "Beyond Fun: Serious Games and Media" this month. The book features the work of more than 15 international contributors examining how games and media can impact learning.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 25, 2008
Snake robots, dancing Keepon robots, breathtaking GigaPan Camerapanoramas and a sheep that mows grass instead of eating it, areCarnegie Mellon's contributions to this year's Wired NextFest, hostedfree to the public by Wired Magazine at Chicago's Millennium Park Sept.25-Oct. 12. The snake robots developed for urbansearch and rescue by Associate Robotics Professor Howie Choset, cancrawl, swim and climb poles.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 23, 2008
One of the final steel beams will be put in place on the new Schoolof Computer Science Complex during a topping-off ceremony on Monday,but not before everyone is given a chance to sign his or her name on it.The beam is available for all students, faculty and staff to sign from9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday. The beam will be located in acorner of the construction site, just behind the Purnell Center loadingdock and Cyert Hall. The best way to get to reach it is to go throughthe Warner Hall parking lot.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 17, 2008
EVENT: — Join Business Week Magazine senior writer Steve Baker for breakfast and a book signing while he discusses "The Numerati," his new book published this month by Houghton-Mifflin Co. In it, Baker describes how computer scientists and applied math experts he calls "numerati" are tracking the digital trails we leave as we work, shop, play, vote, and live. They gather up the reams of data created by using our computers, cell phones, and credit cards and by analyzing the information, they're able to build models of us and predict our behavior.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 09, 2008
Mark your calendars and set your DVRs for 10 pm/9 Central time, Thursday, September 25, as the History Channel rolls out "The Works: Robots," the finale of a new documentary series hosted by Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute alumnus Daniel Wilson. In addition to highlighting the university, the program features Chris Urmson, director of technology for the Urban Grand Challenge and Boss, the Chevy Tahoe that won it last year; senior systems scientist Omead Amidi and his autonomous helicopters; RI Associate Professor Howie Choset and his Snakebots; RI Ph.D.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 09, 2008
PITTSBURGH—Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's RoboticsInstitute are working with colleagues at Caterpillar Inc. to developautonomous versions of large haul trucks used in mining operations.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 04, 2008
Lisa Brown, a first-year graduate student at the Entertainment Technology Center,is one of four recipients of the first annual Randy Pausch ScholarshipFund established by the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences(AIAS).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 02, 2008
September 22 Event will be Streamed Live on ABCNews.com PITTSBURGH—CarnegieMellon University will celebrate the life of Professor Randy Pauschwith a special memorial event at 4:30 p.m., September 22. Pausch, abeloved professor who became famous worldwide for his inspirational"Last Lecture," died July 25 at age 47 of pancreatic cancer.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday September 01, 2008
As more and more people migrate to the web for social interaction, researchers like Jure Leskovec (CS '07, '08) are finding new opportunities to study their collective behavior. While interning at Microsoft Research Redmond, Leskovec began wondering whether or not the "six degrees of separation" theory still rings true in today's wired world.The theory suggests that everyone on Earth can be connected to any random person through less than seven people.

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