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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 16, 2013
Brian Groudan, a double major in information systems and human-computer interaction with a minor in communication design, will be the student speaker at Carnegie Mellon University's 116th Commencement May 19.Groudan, one of the founders of PayTango, an early-stage startup focused on providing biometric identification for payments and access control applications, graduated with university honors in December 2012.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday May 14, 2013
SCS faculty members, students and alumni will predominate among the speakers at the inaugural Launch|CMU, a new semiannual event of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE) that will showcase the university's technology, cutting-edge research and some of its most promising startup companies.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 09, 2013
CREATE Lab Works With Google, USGS and TIME Magazine on Timelapse Project Members of the public can now easily explore almost 30 years of Earth imagery from ASA's Landsat through TIME Magazine's new Timelapse project. The project is a collaborative effort between TIME, Google, ASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), with the assistance of Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday May 07, 2013
Adobe Systems Co-founder Is Computer Science AlumnusPITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University will award the honorary degree of Doctor of Science and Technology to computer science alumnus Charles M. Geschke, co-founder of Adobe Systems Inc., at its 116th Commencement May 19. Also that day, Geschke will speak at the School of Computer Science Diploma Ceremony in Carnegie Music Hall.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday May 06, 2013
HERB, the Robot Butler, Continually Improves Its Understanding of Objects PITTSBURGH—A robot can struggle to discover objects in its surroundings when it relies on computer vision alone. But by taking advantage of all of the information available to it — an object's location, size, shape and even whether it can be lifted — a robot can continually discover and refine its understanding of objects, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 03, 2013
She's One of 10 ational Winners at Robotics Contest PITTSBURGH—aoka Gunawardena, a junior at The Ellis School and a member of the Girls of Steel, a robotics team sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University's Field Robotics Center, was one of 10 national winners of Dean's List honors at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics Competition Championship April 27 in St. Louis.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 03, 2013
"See For Yourself" Exhibit on Display May 3-31 PITTSBURGH—Robots that interpret poetry, the electronic innards of toys and low-cost sensors that count the pollution particles in the air are among the artifacts that will be on display when Carnegie Mellon University's CREATE Lab takes over the Assemble gallery May 3-31.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 01, 2013
John C. Reynolds, a long-time Computer Science Department professor known for his incisive work on the logical foundations of programs and programming languages and for his mentoring of students and junior faculty members, died April 28 of cancer and congestive heart disease. He was 77. A memorial service is scheduled for 11 a.m. on May 11 at Allegheny Cemetery Mausoleum. He is survived by his wife, Mary, and his two sons, Edward and Matthew. John joined the CSD faculty in 1986, but had retired from active teaching as of Jan. 1.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 30, 2013
ZoomBoard Could Help Those with Movement Disorders PITTSBURGH—Technology blogs have been abuzz that smartwatches may soon be on their way from companies such as Apple, Google, Samsung and Microsoft. But as capable as these ultra-small computers may be, how will users enter an address, a name, or a search term into them? One solution is an iterative zooming technique developed and tested by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 29, 2013
Carnegie Mellon, orthwestern Educators Report on Pilot Study PITTSBURGH—Online crowds can be an important tool for teaching the ins and outs of innovation, educators at Carnegie Mellon University and orthwestern University say, even when the quality of the feedback provided by online sources doesn't always match the quantity.

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