SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 10, 2013
Carnegie Mellon University faculty members Raj Reddy and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski and President Subra Suresh have been elected Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).NAI Fellows are recognized for their “prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions and innovations that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.”
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 10, 2013
David Garlan, professor in the Institute for Software Research, is among 50 innovators from the world’s leading universities and corporations named by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) as 2013 Fellows. The list also includes three additional Carnegie Mellon Ph.D. alumni:  James Gosling, Greg Morrisett and Milind Tambe.
By 
Kelly Solman
 - 
Monday December 09, 2013
BirdBrain Technologies, a Carnegie Mellon University startup, has released a flock of its Finch robots for Computer Science Education Week, Dec. 9–15.  Developed at CMU's Robotics Institute, the low-cost, tabletop robots are on loan to educators across the U.S. who are using them to help get kids excited about computer programming.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday December 05, 2013
PITTSBURGH—The images people share on social media — photos of favorite products and places, or of themselves at bars, sporting events and weddings — could be valuable to marketers assessing their customers’ “top-of-mind” attitudes toward a brand. Carnegie Mellon University researchers have taken a first step toward this capability in a new study in which they analyzed five million such images.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday December 04, 2013
PITTSBURGH—It turns out that the way to keep track of your many passwords to online accounts is the same as how to get to Carnegie Hall — practice, practice, practice. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a scheme that enables users to create 100 or more passwords by remembering — and regularly rehearsing — a small number of one-sentence stories.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 03, 2013
Since they were first developed at Carnegie Mellon University, the distorted word puzzles called CAPTCHAs have been known to make people a little crazy, a little upset and prone to muttering words best left distorted.Now these sometimes irritating puzzles, designed to protect Web sites from Internet bots, have inspired song.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 03, 2013
PITTSBURGH—Children who love Garfield, the feline star of the world’s most widely syndicated comic strip, now can make their own computer animations of the lasagna-loving, Monday-adverse cat — and learn a bit about computer programming in the process — with the latest version of Carnegie Mellon University’s Alice educational software.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 25, 2013
PITTSBURGH—The U.S. Department of Education is sponsoring a five-year, $3.7 million project led by Carnegie Mellon University to develop methods that enable people with disabilities to take full advantage of the resources available on the Internet.The Disability Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on Inclusive Cloud and Web Computing includes researchers at Syracuse University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).
By 
Shilo Rea
 - 
Friday November 22, 2013
PITTSBURGH—From using concrete or abstract materials to giving immediate or delayed feedback, there are rampant debates over the best teaching strategies to use. But, in reality, improving education is not as simple as choosing one technique over another.Carnegie Mellon University and Temple University researchers scoured the educational research landscape and found that because improved learning depends on many different factors, there are actually more than 205 trillion instructional options available.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday November 20, 2013
PITTSBURGH—A computer program called the Never Ending Image Learner (NEIL) is running 24 hours a day at Carnegie Mellon University, searching the Web for images, doing its best to understand them on its own and, as it builds a growing visual database, gathering common sense on a massive scale.

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