SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday January 16, 2002
PITTSBURGH—NASA's Ames Research Center has signed an agreement to award $23.3 million to Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science to develop a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional High-Dependability Computing Program (HDCP) to improve NASA's capability to create dependable software. The incremental, five-year cooperative agreement is part of a broad strategy for dependable computing that links Carnegie Mellon, NASA, corporate partners, and other universities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday November 28, 2001
EVENT: More than 300 Pittsburgh-area middle-schoolers from some 20 local educational institutions will compete in the annual FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Lego League robotics competition, Saturday, Dec. 1, at Carnegie Mellon University's National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC) in Lawrenceville. Using LEGO MINDSTORMS TM kits, the students have built autonomous robots designed to help researchers studying climate change above the Arctic Circle who are in danger of being trapped in a huge storm.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 19, 2001
PITTSBURGH--In response to the growing need for standards to evaluate companies providing information technology (IT) enabled outsourcing services, researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) have developed a methodology to rate outsourcing firms and have established a center to certify their capabilities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 13, 2001
PITTSBURGH--In response to the growing need for standards to evaluate companies providing information technology (IT) outsourcing services, researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) have developed a system to rate outsourcing firms and have established a center to certify their capabilities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 29, 2001
PITTSBURGH- Experts in computer science and astrophysics from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh are among researchers from 17 institutions nationwide who will share a $10-million, five-year Information Technology Research (ITR) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help "put the universe on line" via a National Virtual Observatory (NVO)- http://us-vo.org.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 29, 2001
New Venture Aims to Assist U.S. Homeland Anti-Terrorism InitiativesIn response to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, Carnegie Mellon has created an Office for Security Technologies that will work with the federal government to match Carnegie Mellon's capabilities with national security needs. In the aftermath of the national tragedy more than 40 faculty members were identified who have substantive expertise to offer in helping national security efforts.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 12, 2001
PITTSBURGH-Construction of a new $31.4 million research and office facility in Panther Hollow at the western edge of the Carnegie Mellon University campus is scheduled to begin this spring with expected occupancy by summer 2003.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 18, 2001
PITTSBURGH-Carnegie Mellon University will host the region's first Nanotechnology workshop designed to explore theadvantages of creating a computer the size of a library card to store everything a person may see or say in a work day orcreate clothing emeshed with sensors to measure a person's vitalsigns. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, and Engineeringand Computer Science Departments will discuss the potential payoffsof denser hard drives, smaller computer chips and better medicineas a result of Nanotechnology research.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 25, 2001
PITTSBURGH: A prototype solar-powered robot with the potential to be self-sufficient for extended periods of time will be tested in the Canadian Arctic by Carnegie Mellon University researchers in July. The researchers will test a concept called Sun-Synchronous Navigation that may enable autonomous robots to obtain continuous solar power for long-term exploration of distant planets and moons. The robot named Hyperion was developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute with support from NASA.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 19, 2001
EVENT: See a demonstration of a prototype, autonomous solar-powered robot developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute with support from NASA. The robot, named Hyperion, has the potential to be self-sufficient for extended periods of time. In July, it will be taken to Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic, where it will test a concept called Sun-Synchronous Navigation, which involves tracking the sun for power while exploring terrain. The robot will travel opposite to Earth's rotation and in synchrony with the sun.

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