SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 17, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's Red Team, directed by Fredkin Research Professor William L. "Red" Whittaker, collaborating with his students, colleagues and corporate sponsors, is preparing their robot vehicle Sandstorm to qualify in the DARPA Grand Challenge, an unmanned, off-road race for robots that will take place March 13, 2004.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 12, 2004
PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Karlsruhe inGermany, both ranked number one in computer science in their respectivecountries, have agreed to jointly establish a new International Center forAdvanced Communication Technologies (InterACT).The focus of InterACT is to support human-to-human interaction acrosslanguage and cultural barriers, and to do research in pervasive multimodaland multilingual computing environments."We are very pleased to be collaborating with an institution as prestigiousas the University of Karlsruhe," said Carnegie Mellon President Jared L
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 12, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with Carnegie Learning Inc. and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, Mass.), has received a $1.4 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Education to test a Web-based computer tutor Assistment system that will help middle-school students prepare for standardized mathematics tests like those required under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. The No Child Left Behind Act requires public schools to demonstrate yearly improvement as measured by students' scores on standardized tests.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 05, 2004
Event: Unveiling Sandstorm, Carnegie Mellon University's Red Team entry in the $1 million DARPA Grand Challenge, an unmanned, off-road race for robots that will take place March 13, 2004. Sandstorm will be competing against a field of 19 other robots for a $1 million cash prize as it travels 210 tortuous miles from Barstow, Calif., through the Mojave Desert to Las Vegas, Nevada, on its own. Competitors will learn the race route only two hours before it begins at 6 a.m. PST. Once it starts, no human intervention is allowed.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday December 22, 2003
PITTSBURGH—As NASA's twin robot geologists Spirit and Opportunity prepare to land on Mars in January, a cadre of 20 smart robots developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University with support from NASA and Intel Corp.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday December 12, 2003
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has elected Carnegie Mellon University professors Ralph Hollis, Mel Siegel, and Dan Stancil as IEEE Fellows for 2004. The IEEE, a technical professional association of more than 377,000 members, developed the grade of Fellow to recognize individuals who had demonstrated outstanding proficiency and had achieved unusual distinction in the profession. Hollis, a, research professor of Robotics in the School of Computer Science, was recognized for his contributions to multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 09, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University robotics researcher Vladimir Brajovic has developed a tool that automatically improves the appearance of darkened or underexposed photographs by digitally adding light to dark areas. The Shadow Illuminator, funded through a $350,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, was developed originally to help robots see better. Using principles based on the physics of how optical images are formed, Shadow Illuminator imitates the vision processes that take place in the human eye.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday November 26, 2003
PITTSBURGH -- A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon, the University ofPennsylvania and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) won the 2003Gordon Bell Prize, one of high performance computing's most prestigiousawards.The team was honored for developing earthquake computer simulations thatplay an important role in reducing seismic risk.The Quake Project's large scale model calculations and computer animationshave pushed the capability of existing hardware and software systems."The Bell Prize recognized our recent Los Angeles Basin earthquakesimulations on PSC's 3000-processo
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 18, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) has received a $400,000, three-year grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to fund a program aimed at increasing the number of women studying computer science at the graduate level.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 10, 2003
PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University will induct four famous robots into its newly established Robot Hall of Fame at 8 p.m., this evening, at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center.

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