SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 18, 2001
PITTSBURGH-Carnegie Mellon University will host the region's first Nanotechnology workshop designed to explore theadvantages of creating a computer the size of a library card to store everything a person may see or say in a work day orcreate clothing emeshed with sensors to measure a person's vitalsigns. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, and Engineeringand Computer Science Departments will discuss the potential payoffsof denser hard drives, smaller computer chips and better medicineas a result of Nanotechnology research.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 25, 2001
PITTSBURGH: A prototype solar-powered robot with the potential to be self-sufficient for extended periods of time will be tested in the Canadian Arctic by Carnegie Mellon University researchers in July. The researchers will test a concept called Sun-Synchronous Navigation that may enable autonomous robots to obtain continuous solar power for long-term exploration of distant planets and moons. The robot named Hyperion was developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute with support from NASA.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 19, 2001
EVENT: See a demonstration of a prototype, autonomous solar-powered robot developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute with support from NASA. The robot, named Hyperion, has the potential to be self-sufficient for extended periods of time. In July, it will be taken to Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic, where it will test a concept called Sun-Synchronous Navigation, which involves tracking the sun for power while exploring terrain. The robot will travel opposite to Earth's rotation and in synchrony with the sun.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday June 14, 2001
Vivisimo, which means very lively and clever in Spanish, was developed by a team of faculty, post-docs and students in Carnegie Mellons Computer Science Department. The technology is based on a specially developed algorithm to group or cluster textual documents. The software calls other search engineslike Yahoo! and MSNextracts the relevant information (titles, URLs, and short descriptions), and groups it based on this summarized information.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 31, 2001
SEATTLE-RoboCup, the five-year-old international sporting and scientific event featuring autonomous soccer-playing and rescue robots of all shapes and sizes will take place in the U.S. for the first time, Aug. 2-10, in Seattle at the Washington State Convention and Trade Center. http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~robocup2001/.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 17, 2001
PITTSBURGH: Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute (LTI) in the School of Computer Science will host "Language Technologies 2001," a meeting of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL), June 2-7 on the university campus. More than 400 experts from academia and industry are expected to attend the event, which will include tutorials, workshops, exhibits and demonstrations of the latest in research and products related to language technologies.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 02, 2001
PITTSBURGH-More than 80 people from academia, industry and government will be meeting to discuss "Dependability in Real Life" at the High Dependability Computing Consortium's (HDCC), second workshop, May 7-8, at Chaminade in Santa Cruz, Calif. The HDCC was established in December 2000,by Carnegie Mellon University and NASA's Ames Research Center in the Silicon Valley.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday March 27, 2001
PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) will host a forum on how to make computer technology and the field of computer science a more friendly discipline for girls and young women. Enhancing the position of women in the field is beneficial for everyone because of the different perspective they bring to the development and use of computer technology.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 08, 2001
PITTSBURGH--Vivisimo, a new software system developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers that quickly and automatically groups Web search results into easily browsed clusters of related information, has been ranked a top tier search engine tool by ZD Net, a key online resource for information about new technology.(www.zdnet.com/searchiq)Vivisimo, which means very lively and clever in Spanish, was developed by a team of faculty, post-docs and students in Carnegie Mellon's Computer Science Department.

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