SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 07, 2016
Could a tail have allowed ancient vertebrates to make the transition from water to land?
By 
Susie Cribbs
 - 
Wednesday July 06, 2016
Before she even arrived at Carnegie Mellon University in 2013, Rachel Holladay had already built a mapping website that displayed geochemical physical data about the Gulf of Mexico for the United States Department of the Navy, and had spent nearly a decade involved in the FIRST Robotics program.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday July 06, 2016
Chalk up one more task a smartphone app may do better than you: figuring out your privacy settings.A field study suggests that a personalized privacy assistant app being developed at Carnegie Mellon University can simplify the chore of setting permissions for your smartphone apps. That's a task that requires well over a hundred decisions — an unmanageable number for the typical user.The privacy assistant can learn the user's preferences and quickly recommend the most appropriate settings, such as with which app to share the user's location or contact list.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 27, 2016
The development of an electronic Braille writing tutor at a school for the blind in India has been a labor of love over the past decade for M. Bernardine Dias and her Carnegie Mellon University colleagues, students and staff. And for the past year, it has provided a research window into the role love plays in engineering.
By 
Shilo Rea
 - 
Thursday June 23, 2016
Researchers face growing pressure to report accurate findings, even as they interpret increasingly larger amounts of data. One way to ensure such accuracy? Following sound statistical practices. A team of statisticians, including Carnegie Mellon’s Robert Kass, aims to help researchers do just that in their article, "Ten Simple Rules for Effective Statistical Practice."
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 22, 2016
Artificial intelligence has the potential to benefit humankind in diverse and deep ways, but only to the extent that people believe these smart systems can be trusted. The technical means for ensuring AI systems operate in a safe, controlled manner will be the focus of a June 28 workshop at Carnegie Mellon University.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday June 17, 2016
The Inamori Foundation has named Takeo Kanade, the U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor of Robotics and Computer Science, as the winner of the prestigious 2016 Kyoto Prize for Advanced Technology, citing his pioneering contributions to computer vision and robotics.The international award is presented to individuals who have contributed significantly to the scientific, cultural and spiritual betterment of humankind.
By 
Susie Cribbs
 - 
Tuesday June 07, 2016
In an article published on May 13, the Washington Post claimed that Donald Trump routinely posed as his own public relations agent in the 1980s and 1990s, using the alias "John Miller" or "John Barron" to boast of Trump's personal and professional successes. When questioned about it now, though, Trump resolutely denies doing any such thing. What's a person to believe?
By 
 - 
Wednesday June 01, 2016
The Virtual World Society will award its first Nextant Prize to the late Randy Pausch, a renowned Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist and virtual world innovator, on June 1 at the Augmented World Expo in Santa Clara, Calif. Pausch, who earned his Ph.D.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 25, 2016
Machine-learning algorithms increasingly make decisions about credit, medical diagnoses, personalized recommendations, advertising and job opportunities, among other things, but exactly how usually remains a mystery. Now, new measurement methods developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers could provide important insights to this process.

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