SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Shilo Rea
 - 
Thursday July 21, 2016
A new Carnegie Mellon University neuroimaging study reveals the mental stages people go through as they solve challenging math problems.In the study, which was published in Psychological Science, researchers combined two analytical strategies to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify patterns of brain activity that aligned with four distinct stages of problem-solving: encoding, planning, solving and responding.
By 
Daniel Tkacik
 - 
Thursday July 21, 2016
SCS’s Yuvraj Agarwal and Srinivasan Seshan have joined with Vyas Sekar of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department on a National Science Foundation-funded project to develop a software-based solution to the problem of security for the Internet of Things. 
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 21, 2016
A new method for analyzing the scrambled genomes of cancer cells allows researchers, for the first time, to simultaneously identify two different types of genetic changes associated with cancers and to identify connections between the two.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 21, 2016
Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World, Werner Herzog’s documentary featuring several Carnegie Mellon researchers, will be screened by Pittsburgh Filmmakers at the Regent Square Theater at 7:30 p.m. July 29. Three people in the film — NREC’s Mike Vandeweghe, ECE’s Raj Rajkumar and Psychology’s Marcel Just — will participate in a Q&A. Advance tickets are available online.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday July 18, 2016
A new computational design tool can turn a flat sheet of plastic or metal into a complex 3-D shape, such as a mask, sculpture or even a lady's high-heel shoe.Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland, say the tool enables designers to fully and creatively exploit an unusual quality of certain materials — the ability to expand uniformly in two dimensions. A rubber band, by contrast, contracts in one dimension while being stretched in another.
By 
Susie Cribbs
 - 
Tuesday July 12, 2016
The School of Computer Science has named rising seniors Rachel Holladay and Ananya Kumar the recipients of this year's Mark Stehlik SCS Alumni Undergraduate Impact Scholarship.Now in its second year, the Stehlik Scholarship recognizes undergraduate students near the end of their Carnegie Mellon careers whose reach for excellence extends beyond the classroom. Awardees are working to make a difference in SCS, the field of computer science and the world around them.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 07, 2016
Could a tail have allowed ancient vertebrates to make the transition from water to land?
By 
Susie Cribbs
 - 
Wednesday July 06, 2016
Before she even arrived at Carnegie Mellon University in 2013, Rachel Holladay had already built a mapping website that displayed geochemical physical data about the Gulf of Mexico for the United States Department of the Navy, and had spent nearly a decade involved in the FIRST Robotics program.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday July 06, 2016
Chalk up one more task a smartphone app may do better than you: figuring out your privacy settings.A field study suggests that a personalized privacy assistant app being developed at Carnegie Mellon University can simplify the chore of setting permissions for your smartphone apps. That's a task that requires well over a hundred decisions — an unmanageable number for the typical user.The privacy assistant can learn the user's preferences and quickly recommend the most appropriate settings, such as with which app to share the user's location or contact list.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 27, 2016
The development of an electronic Braille writing tutor at a school for the blind in India has been a labor of love over the past decade for M. Bernardine Dias and her Carnegie Mellon University colleagues, students and staff. And for the past year, it has provided a research window into the role love plays in engineering.

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