SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday April 07, 2006
See also.You could call it a "Tale of Two Buildings."Initial designs for the new Gates Center for Computer Science were introduced to the university community last week, revealing not one but two contemporary structures that will make up the new home for the School of Computer Science (SCS).Mack Scogin, principal of the Atlanta-based Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects Inc., gave a preview of plans for the new center during a School of Architecture-sponsored lecture at the Carnegie Museum Lecture Hall on April 3 and an
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 30, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) is extending its leadership in the burgeoning field of machine learning by creating the nation's first Machine Learning Department.The new department designation for what was formerly known as the Center for Automated Learning and Discovery (CALD) reflects the importance of machine learning in such growing areas as data mining and sensor networks, as well as a commitment by the university to continue its pioneering efforts in the field.Tom M.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 23, 2006
The university is renovating part of an old locomotive roundhouse on the future Robot City site to serve as the home for the Red Team and elements of the Field Robotics Center. William "Red" Whittaker hopes to turn the former LTV site into Robot City. The robots once housed in the Planetary Robotics Building — including the Red Team and its famed robotic race vehicles — have moved to new quarters on the former LTV site in Hazelwood.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 06, 2006
EVENT: Carnegie Mellon University and Electronic Arts Inc. (EA) will announce a groundbreaking collaboration that can revolutionize how computer programming is taught in the U.S. With input from EA, Carnegie Mellon's popular Alice programming software (www.alice.org), currently used at 100 high schools and universities in the U.S., will reach new levels of visual excitement and usability, especially among young women and minorities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 23, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that our ears use the most efficient way to process the sounds we hear, from babbling brooks to wailing babies. These results represent a significant advance in understanding how sound is encoded for transmission to the brain, according to the authors, whose work is published with an accompanying "News and Views" editorial in the Feb. 23 issue of Nature.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 14, 2006
Manuel Blum, SCS' Bruce Nelson professor of computer science, and Pradeep K. Khosla, dean of the college of engineering and Philip and Marsha Dowd professor of engineering and robotics, are two of five Carnegie Mellon University professors who have been elected this year to the National Academy of Engineering. The others include Christina H. Amon, Egon Balas, and Krzysztof A. Matyjaszewski.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday February 10, 2006
PITTSBURGH— Carnegie Mellon University professors Cristina H. Amon, Egon Balas, Manuel Blum, Pradeep K. Khosla and Krzysztof A. Matyjaszewski have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Membership in the NAE honors people who have made important contributions to engineering theory and practice and who have demonstrated unusual accomplishments in pioneering new and developing fields of technology. It is one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can achieve.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday January 11, 2006
PITTSBURGH-James E. Tomayko, teaching professor in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS), director emeritus of its Master in Software Engineering program (MSE), and fondly known as "Coach" to his students, friends and colleagues, died yesterday after a long illness. He was 56. During his more than 16-year tenure at the university, he not only helped to found SCS' highly successful MSE program, but also initiated an extensive program in distance learning that currently includes 140 students who reside all over the world.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday December 16, 2005
PITTSBURGH—Andrew W. Moore, Carnegie Mellon University professor of computer science and robotics, has been chosen by Google Inc., developer of the award-winning search engine, to head a new engineering office that will open in Pittsburgh sometime in 2006. The new engineering office will focus on creating a variety of search tools for Google and could act as an engine for creating new high-tech jobs in the Pittsburgh area. Moore, 40, is an expert in data mining and artificial intelligence.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday December 12, 2005
PITTSBURGH—In conjunction with the once-in-a-decade White House Conference on Aging, Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers will demonstrate new technologies to enhance the lives of the elderly at the Center for Aging Services Technologies (CAST) exhibition, Dec. 12-14, in Washington, D.C. The researchers will showcase their technologies at a booth in the Imagine Technology Pavilion at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, 2660 Woodley Park Road N.W.

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