SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 26, 2007
Microsoft and Carnegie Mellon University today announced the creation of the Microsoft Carnegie Mellon Center for Computational Thinking. The center was made possible through a three-year, $1.5 million grant from Microsoft.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 28, 2007
An underwater robot, shaped like a flattened orange, maneuvered untethered and autonomously within a 115-meter-deep sinkhole during tests this month in Mexico, a prelude to its mission to probe the mysterious nether reaches of the world's deepest sinkhole. Bill Stone, leader of the NASA-funded Deep Phreatic Thermal Explorer (DEPTHX) mission, said the 2.5-meter-diameter vehicle performed "phenomenally well" during early February tests in the geothermal sinkhole, or cenote, known as La Pilita.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 15, 2007
New research shows a patient-centered case management program designed to improve healthcare quality and reduce medical expenses for those with complex or clinically advanced illnesses resulted in a 38 percent decrease in hospital admissions, reduced costs by more than $18,000 per patient and garnered high patient-satisfaction scores. The study of Blue Shield of California HMO members, published in the February edition of The American Journal of Managed Care, examined the program's impact on those with illnesses like late-stage cancers — some of the most complex cases to treat.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 14, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University, in cooperation with the Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) in Tokyo, Japan, has established the Katayanagi Prizes in Computer Science. The prizes have been endowed with a gift from Japanese entrepreneur and education advocate Mr. Koh Katayanagi, who founded TUT and several other technical institutions in Japan during the last 60 years.The awards, to be made annually, include the Katayanagi Prize for Research Excellence and the Katayanagi Emerging Leadership Prize.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 13, 2007
Autonomous navigation software developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) drove the NASA Mars Rover "Opportunity" last week in the software's first live test on the Red Planet. Preliminary data from the test run, which was initiated Feb. 7, indicates it was successful. Opportunity, operating near the rim of Victoria Crater, was traversing an area that mission managers had made certain was without obstacles for this initial test.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday February 12, 2007
Join author Lee Gutkind in 5700 Wean Hall at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 27, for a book signing and presentation on "Almost Human, Making Robots Think," a new book about the people and projects at Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, to be published March 19 by W.W. Norton & Co.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday February 09, 2007
The InterACT center, which began in 2004 as a joint program of Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science and its counterpart at the University of Karlsruhe, has expanded its global reach with the addition of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.Representatives of Carnegie Mellon, Karlsruhe and HKUST signed a three-year collaborative agreement in Hong Kong on Feb. 1."Now, InterACT is a worldwide center, providing greater access for students in an area of rapid economic growth," said its director, Alex Waibel, professor, Language Technologies Institute.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 06, 2007
People routinely use their computers to share baby photos, corny jokes and hot music files, but an invention by Carnegie Mellon University computer science students is helping users share something more personal: their emotions. "MoodJam" is a software application that helps people express their moods in words and, strikingly, in bands of color. This creates a colorful and often artistic daily record, displayed either on MoodJam's Web site, www.moodjam.org, or on an individual's homepage. Ian Li, a Ph.D.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday January 31, 2007
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has chosen Jeannette Wing, the President's Professor and head of the Computer Science Department in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS), to be its assistant director for Computer Science & Information Science and Engineering (CISE). She will assume her new position July 1.In this post, Wing will guide and manage funding for the federal agency that supports research in computer and information science and engineering.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 29, 2007
The Tartan Racing team, Carnegie Mellon's entry in this year's DARPA Urban Challenge, will be featured in an episode of the Discovery Channel's four-part series, FutureCar. The series will debut Feb. 7 at 8 p.m.; the episode titled "The Brain" that airs on Feb. 28 will include interviews with Tartan Racing's William "Red" Whittaker and Chris Urmson.Tartan Racing is preparing a self-driving Chevy Tahoe called Boss for the Nov. 3 race.

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