SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 10, 2007
John Zimmerman, an associate professor in Carnegie Mellon University'sSchool of Design and Human-Computer Interaction Institute, has developed an unconventional alarm clock every new parent needs — a clock to keep their children sleeping. Called the Reverse Alarm Clock, the product aims to keep young children from interrupting their parents' sleep."We saw this as a perfect starting point for our project.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday May 07, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Computer Science Luis von Ahn is one of five recipients this year of Microsoft Research's New Faculty Fellowship, an award that seeks to identify young professors who are likely to become leaders in the field of computer science. Luis von Ahn"The caliber of the Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellows is simply stunning," said Sailesh Chutani, director of External Research & Programs at Microsoft Research. "They have already obtained significant results.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 03, 2007
William L. "Red" Whittaker, Carnegie Mellon University's Fredkin Research Professor of Robotics and founder of the Robotics Institute's Field Robotics and National Robotics Engineering centers, has been named a University Professor, the highest rank the institution confers upon its faculty.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 03, 2007
Two V-Unit teams, one working on BlindAid, an indoor navigation assistant for the blind (Robotics Institute graduate students Maxim Makatchev, Sandra Mau and Nik Melchior), and another working on DeSIGN, an intelligent tutor for American Sign Language (Robotics Institute graduate students Vinithra Varadharajan and Ling Xu), are featured in Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Article.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 25, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a new series of robots that are simple enough for almost anyone to build with off-the-shelf parts, but are sophisticated machines that wirelessly connect to the Internet. The robots can take many forms, from a three-wheeled model with a mounted camera to a flower loaded with infrared sensors.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 23, 2007
Frances Allen, the first woman to receive the nation's top computer science honor, the A.M. Turing Award, will be a keynote speaker this fall at a conference focusing on computer science research opportunities for undergraduate women. The first-of-its-kind conference, titled OurCS (Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science), will be held Oct. 5-7 at Carnegie Mellon University.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 10, 2007
A Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist says transferring large data files, such as movies and music, over the Internet could be sped up significantly if peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing services were configured to share not only identical files, but also similar files. David G. Andersen, assistant professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon, and Michael Kaminsky of Intel Research Pittsburgh have designed such a system, called Similarity-Enhanced Transfer (SET).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 05, 2007
Experts in medicine, technology and public policy will discuss how new applications of information technology can enhance the quality of life for a growing population of older adults and people with disabilities at an April 12 public symposium at Carnegie Mellon University. The event, which will be held from noon to 5 p.m. in Carnegie Mellon's University Center, is sponsored by the National Academy of Engineering and the Quality of Life Technology Center.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 03, 2007
Boss, the self-driving SUV of Carnegie Mellon University's Tartan Racing team, can already negotiate some city streets and intersections. And after two months of testing in Arizona, Boss is beginning to master another challenging environment — the parking lot. Finding a spot, parking legally and then leaving the lot without a fender bender is a task Boss will need to perform this fall in the Urban Challenge, a 60-mile competition for autonomous vehicles sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 26, 2007
Microsoft and Carnegie Mellon University today announced the creation of the Microsoft Carnegie Mellon Center for Computational Thinking. The center was made possible through a three-year, $1.5 million grant from Microsoft.

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