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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 23, 2007
Frances Allen, the first woman to receive the nation's top computer science honor, the A.M. Turing Award, will be a keynote speaker this fall at a conference focusing on computer science research opportunities for undergraduate women. The first-of-its-kind conference, titled OurCS (Opportunities for Undergraduate Research in Computer Science), will be held Oct. 5-7 at Carnegie Mellon University.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 10, 2007
A Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist says transferring large data files, such as movies and music, over the Internet could be sped up significantly if peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing services were configured to share not only identical files, but also similar files. David G. Andersen, assistant professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon, and Michael Kaminsky of Intel Research Pittsburgh have designed such a system, called Similarity-Enhanced Transfer (SET).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 05, 2007
Experts in medicine, technology and public policy will discuss how new applications of information technology can enhance the quality of life for a growing population of older adults and people with disabilities at an April 12 public symposium at Carnegie Mellon University. The event, which will be held from noon to 5 p.m. in Carnegie Mellon's University Center, is sponsored by the National Academy of Engineering and the Quality of Life Technology Center.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday April 03, 2007
Boss, the self-driving SUV of Carnegie Mellon University's Tartan Racing team, can already negotiate some city streets and intersections. And after two months of testing in Arizona, Boss is beginning to master another challenging environment — the parking lot. Finding a spot, parking legally and then leaving the lot without a fender bender is a task Boss will need to perform this fall in the Urban Challenge, a 60-mile competition for autonomous vehicles sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 26, 2007
Microsoft and Carnegie Mellon University today announced the creation of the Microsoft Carnegie Mellon Center for Computational Thinking. The center was made possible through a three-year, $1.5 million grant from Microsoft.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 28, 2007
An underwater robot, shaped like a flattened orange, maneuvered untethered and autonomously within a 115-meter-deep sinkhole during tests this month in Mexico, a prelude to its mission to probe the mysterious nether reaches of the world's deepest sinkhole. Bill Stone, leader of the NASA-funded Deep Phreatic Thermal Explorer (DEPTHX) mission, said the 2.5-meter-diameter vehicle performed "phenomenally well" during early February tests in the geothermal sinkhole, or cenote, known as La Pilita.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 15, 2007
New research shows a patient-centered case management program designed to improve healthcare quality and reduce medical expenses for those with complex or clinically advanced illnesses resulted in a 38 percent decrease in hospital admissions, reduced costs by more than $18,000 per patient and garnered high patient-satisfaction scores. The study of Blue Shield of California HMO members, published in the February edition of The American Journal of Managed Care, examined the program's impact on those with illnesses like late-stage cancers — some of the most complex cases to treat.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 14, 2007
Carnegie Mellon University, in cooperation with the Tokyo University of Technology (TUT) in Tokyo, Japan, has established the Katayanagi Prizes in Computer Science. The prizes have been endowed with a gift from Japanese entrepreneur and education advocate Mr. Koh Katayanagi, who founded TUT and several other technical institutions in Japan during the last 60 years.The awards, to be made annually, include the Katayanagi Prize for Research Excellence and the Katayanagi Emerging Leadership Prize.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 13, 2007
Autonomous navigation software developed by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) drove the NASA Mars Rover "Opportunity" last week in the software's first live test on the Red Planet. Preliminary data from the test run, which was initiated Feb. 7, indicates it was successful. Opportunity, operating near the rim of Victoria Crater, was traversing an area that mission managers had made certain was without obstacles for this initial test.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday February 12, 2007
Join author Lee Gutkind in 5700 Wean Hall at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 27, for a book signing and presentation on "Almost Human, Making Robots Think," a new book about the people and projects at Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, to be published March 19 by W.W. Norton & Co.

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