SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 13, 2007
EVENT: Tartan Racing's self-driving SUV, named Boss, will demonstrate its street savvy during a site visit and inspection by representatives of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Tartan Racing is one of 53 teams contending for a spot in DARPA's Urban Challenge, a Nov. 3 race that will pit autonomous vehicles against each other on a course that simulates an urban driving environment. The top prize is $2 million.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday June 11, 2007
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new computerized method for matching living kidney donors with kidney disease patients that can increase the number of kidney transplants — and save lives. This step-by-step method, or algorithm, could significantly boost the efficiency of kidney exchanges, a mechanism for matching live donors with unrelated recipients. Kidney exchanges are now considered the best chance for boosting the number of kidney transplants in the United States.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday June 08, 2007
Pamela Jennings, assistant professor in the School of Computer Science's Human-Computer Interaction Institute and the School of Art in the College of Fine Arts, is the curator of a digital media art exhibition being held at the headquarters of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington D.C. The exhibition is part of the Association for Computing Machinery's ACM Creativity and Cognition Conference, which takes place in Washington June 13-15, 2007.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 06, 2007
People are willing to pay extra to buy items from online retailers when they can easily ascertain how retailers' policies will protect their privacy, a new Carnegie Mellon University study shows. Participants in the laboratory study used a Carnegie Mellon shopping search engine called Privacy Finder, www.privacyfinder.org, which can automatically evaluate a Web site's privacy policies and display the results on the search results page.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 05, 2007
Randal E. Bryant, University Professor and dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, is the 2007 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) Emanuel R. Piore Award. Bryant received the award in recognition of his seminal contributions to the simulation and verification of electronic systems. The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. Its Emanuel R. Piore Award recognizes outstanding contributions in the field of information processing as they relate to computer science.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 31, 2007
A robotic vehicle designed for underwater exploration plunged repeatedly into the depths of Mexico's mysterious El Zacatón sinkhole in late May, finding its previously undiscovered bottom 318 meters below the surface and generating a sonar map of its inner dimensions.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 30, 2007
Peter Lee, professor and vice provost for research at Carnegie Mellon University, has been named the new head of the Computer Science Department in the School of Computer Science. He succeeds Jeannette Wing, who on July 1 will become assistant director of Computer Science and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) at the National Science Foundation. "Peter has done an extraordinary job since assuming the post of vice provost for research last summer," said Carnegie Mellon Provost and Senior Vice President Mark Kamlet.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday May 29, 2007
In a digitized world where massive amounts of patient data can be compromised by a single lost laptop or an individual's identity can be swiped by an online "phishing" expedition, the need for information security is vital.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 24, 2007
A Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist is enlisting the unwitting help of thousands, if not millions, of Web users each day to eliminate a technical bottleneck that has slowed efforts to transform books, newspapers and other printed materials into digitized text that is computer searchable.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday May 21, 2007
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and the Russian Academy of Science will share the Association for Computing Machinery's 2007 Gödel Prize for their seminal work on what many consider the most important unresolved question in theoretical computer science. Steven Rudich, professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon, and Alexander A.

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