SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday February 29, 2008
PITTSBURGH–"One Cold Hand," (www.onecoldhand.com), a Web site designed to reunite lost gloves with their mates, is the winner of Carnegie Mellon University's first Smiley Award. This award, sponsored by Yahoo! Inc., will be presented annually to recognize "innovation in technology-assisted person-to-person communication." The award competition is open to all graduate and undergraduate students at Carnegie Mellon. The award is named in honor of the ubiquitous Smiley emoticon, :-), created at the university 25 years ago.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 27, 2008
PITTSBURGH— Educators at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Academy have developed ROBOTC, a programming environment optimized for use with educational robots at the high school and college levels. Its industry-leading features enable the beginning student to successfully design and program sophisticated robots in hours, rather than the weeks of instruction typical of other systems. The ROBOTC programming language works with LEGO Mindstorms RCX & NXT, as well as with the Innovation First VEX and FRC controllers.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 20, 2008
PITTSBURGH— The Henry L. Hillman Foundation has given Carnegie Mellon University a gift of $10 million for a research building in the university's new computer science complex. The Hillman Center for Future-Generation Technologies, one of two structures in the 200,000-square-foot complex that also includes the Gates Center for Computer Science, will face Forbes Avenue, one of Pittsburgh's main thoroughfares, and serve as the main entrance to the university's world-renowned School of Computer Science.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday February 18, 2008
PITTSBURGH— Have you ever wondered why NASCAR racing appeals to such a vast audience? Or are you puzzled over the difference between a "crew" chief and a "car" chief?
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 12, 2008
PITTSBURGH— Raj Reddy, Carnegie Mellon University's Mozah Bint Nasser University Professor of Computer Science and Robotics, has been awarded the IEEE's James L. Flanagan Speech and Audio Processing Award "for leadership and pioneering contributions to speech recognition, natural language understanding, and machine intelligence." The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) established the award in 2002 to honor achievements in all aspects of speech and audio technology.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday February 04, 2008
Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science Professor Edmund M. Clarke and two computer scientists from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Grenoble in France, are winners of the 2007 A.M. Turing Award in recognition of their pioneering work on an automated method for finding design errors in computer hardware and software. The method, called Model Checking, is the most widely used technique for detecting and diagnosing errors in complex hardware and software design.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday January 31, 2008
The Robotics Institute is the winner of the Chairman's Award in the 2008 Carnegie Science Awards, a recognition of the institute's role in promoting science and technology in the region.The Entertainment Technology Center won in the information technology category, while Mellon College of Science physicist Tiziana Di Matteo was cited as "emerging female scientist."The 2008 awards, which are sponsored by Eaton Corp., were announced by the Carnegie Science Center at a luncheon for news media on Jan. 31 and will be formally presented at Carnegie Music Hall on May 9.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday January 31, 2008
PITTSBURGH, PA...January 31, 2008— Carnegie Science Center today announced the winners of its 2008 Carnegie Science Awards, sponsored by Eaton Corporation. Carnegie Science Center established the Carnegie Science Awards program in 1997 to recognize and promote outstanding science and technology achievements in western Pennsylvania. Celebrating its 12th year, the Carnegie Science Awards have honored the accomplishments of more than 200 individuals and organizations that have improved lives through their commitment, courage and contributions.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday January 30, 2008
Randy Pausch went to Capitol Hill on Jan. 23 to help the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) launch its Raise the Cure campaign, which seeks to combine $170 million in federal funding for pancreatic cancer research with $25 million in private funding over three years.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday January 28, 2008
Carnegie Mellon University Cognitive Neuroscience Professor Marcel Just and Computer Science Professor Tom M. Mitchell have received a three-year, $1.1 million grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to pursue new breakthroughs in the science of brain imaging.

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