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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 11, 2005
Carnegie Mellon University's Sandstorm robot, being groomed for the 2005 Grand Challenge desert race, made four successful runs yesterday during tests by DARPA evaluators at the Nevada Automotive Test Center near Carson City. Successful performance in these tests is critical to Sandstorm being chosen as a semi-finalist in the quest to enter the Grand Challenge, a 175-mile rumble for robots that will take place Oct.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 06, 2005
PITTSBURGH—On May 10, Carnegie Mellon University's Sandstorm robot will demonstrate that it has the skills to compete in the 2005 Grand Challenge, a no-holds-barred, driverless race across 175 miles of hostile desert terrain, for a $2-million prize. Sandstorm, which went furthest and fastest in the first Grand Challenge, held in March 2004, will be tested by DARPA evaluators at the Nevada Automotive Test Center (www.natc-ht.com) near Carson City, Nev. Carnegie Mellon's Red Team, which built Sandstorm, is one of 118 teams hosting similar evaluations.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 27, 2005
HCI Professor Brad Myers, and his student Jake Wobbrock who are academic partners of Microsoft Research in Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science have been invited to participate in the Microsoft Research Tech Fair 2005. The event takes place Wed., April 27 at the National Digital Library Learning Center in the James Madison Building of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 27, 2005
PITTSBURGH—On May 5, Carnegie Mellon University's H1ghlander robot will demonstrate that it has the skills to compete in the 2005 Grand Challenge, a driverless rumble through 175 miles of hostile desert terrain, including mountains, gullies and dry lakebeds, for a $2-million prize. The DARPA-sponsored, winner-take-all race will take place on Oct.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 11, 2005
PITTSBURGH—A group of Carnegie Mellon University researchers are part of an eight-institution team that will work on cybersecurity and trustworthy computing issues within a new National Science Foundation-funded (NSF) Science and Technology Center led by the University of California at Berkeley. NSF announced its intention to establish and fund the center today with a $19 million award, which they intend to disburse over five years.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 31, 2005
PITTSBURGH—A team of Carnegie Mellon University computer science students will compete with more than 200 of the world's "best and brightest" programmers at the IBM-sponsored Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) International Collegiate Programming Contest World Finals April 3-7, in Shanghai, China.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 31, 2005
PITTSBURGH—Takeo Kanade, the U.A./Helen Whitaker university professor of robotics at Carnegie Mellon University, has initiated a gift of his papers and memorabilia to the University Archives.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 14, 2005
PITTSBURGH—The W.M. Keck Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon University a $750,000 grant to support research into how the human brain deciphers language, which could one day yield advances in the treatment of neurological disorders such as autism and dyslexia. This multidisciplinary research is being conducted by Marcel Just, the D.O. Hebb Professor of Psychology, and Tom Mitchell, the Edward Fredkin Professor of Artificial Intelligence and Learning in the School of Computer Science.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday March 09, 2005
PITTSBURGH—Nomad, one of Carnegie Mellon University's most accomplished robotic rovers, is at it again. This time the rover that trekked 220 km through Chile's Atacama Desert and explored Antarctica for meteorites, is being groomed for a potential return to the frozen continent to search for signs of living microorganisms near the top of its icy surface.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 07, 2005
PITTSBURGH — On March 6, Port Authority of Allegheny County will introduce a voice-activated, spoken dialogue system, developed by Carnegie Mellon University language technology experts with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), designed to make bus-scheduling information more accessible to elderly riders. Initially, the automated system will offer information through March 20 on 10 bus routes operating in the East End section of Pittsburgh during times when Port Authority customer service representatives are not available to answer telephones.

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