Five CMU Faculty Members Named 2014 IEEE Fellows

BY Byron Spice - Wed, 2014-01-08 12:12  Printer-friendly version

Kathleen Carley and Garth Gibson of the School of Computer Science, along with an adjunct computer science faculty member and two CMU engineering faculty members with SCS courtesy appointments, have been named 2014 IEEE Fellows.

The IEEE is the world's largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. The IEEE Board of Directors awards the rank of fellow to a person with an outstanding record of accomplishment.

Carley, a professor in the Institute for Software Research and director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems (CASOS), was cited by IEEE for her contributions to multi-dimensional human and cyber dynamic networks.

Gibson, a professor of computer science and founder of the university’s Parallel Data Laboratory, was cited by IEEE for his contributions to the performance and reliability of transformative storage systems.

Phillip Gibbons, an adjunct professor of computer science and co-director of the Intel Science & Technology Center for cloud computing, was cited for his contributions to parallel computing and databases.

Metin Sitti, a professor of mechanical engineering with an appointment to the Robotics Institute, was named a Fellow for his contributions to micro- and nano-scale robotic systems. Richard Stern, a professor of electrical and computer engineering with affiliations to the Computer Science Department and the Language Technologies Institute, was cited by IEEE for his contributions to robust speech recognition and auditory perception.

Through its 400,000 members in 160 countries, the IEEE is a leading authority on a wide range of areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics.

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