SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday December 20, 2006
A German-based project team in the International Center for Advanced Communication Technologies (InterACT), a partnership of Carnegie Mellon and the University of Karlsruhe (Germany) headed by LTI Professor Alex Waibel, received one of three "best exhibit" awards at the 2006 IST conference held in Nov. 21-23 in Helsinki, Finland. IST—Information Society Technologies--is a research program funded by the European Union. More than 4,500 visitors attended the 2006 conference, which is held biannually at sites around the world.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday December 14, 2006
Lorrie Cranor, associate research professor in computer science and engineering and public policy, and Elisa Bertino of Purdue University have received funding for work in privacy and security policy management through IBM's new Open Collaboration Research (OCR) program.Carnegie Mellon is one of seven leading U.S.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday December 13, 2006
With the support of a $285,000 grant from Pennsylvania's Ben Franklin Technology Development Authority, Carnegie Mellon University's Global Connection Project will use new imaging technology to enable "virtual tourists" to immerse themselves in the state's Civil War trails.The Global Connection Project's Gigapan technology makes it possible to create panoramic views of the trail that will be available online. The technology allows viewers to zoom in on the image to see items of interest in greater detail.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 12, 2006
Carnegie Mellon University faculty members John Lafferty, ChuckThorpe and Tsuhan Chen have have been elected 2007 Fellows of the Instituteof Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE). The Institute representsengineers, scientists and allied professionals whose technical interests arerooted in electrical and computer sciences, engineering and relateddisciplines. The IEEE has more than 360,000 members in 150 countries aroundthe world.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 05, 2006
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University are using data mining techniques to identify perpetrators of fraud among online auction users as well as their otherwise unknown accomplices.The new method analyzes publicly available histories of transactions posted by online auction sites such as eBay and identifies suspicious online behaviors and dubious associations among users.Online auction sites are immensely popular. The largest, eBay, reported third quarter revenues of $1.449 billion, up 31 percent from the previous year, and registered 212 million users, up 26 percent.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 27, 2006
Tiankai Tu, Computer Science Department Ph.D. student, and David O'Hallaron, Associate Professor, Computer Science Department and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, led a team of researchers to win the HPC Analytics Challenge at ACM/IEEE Supercomputing 2006 in Tampa, FL. The winning entry is titled Remote Runtime Steering of Integrated Terascale Simulation and Visualization.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday November 15, 2006
A team of freshmen and sophomore computer science students will be headed to Japan next spring to represent Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science in the World Finals of the 31st ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest.Sophomores Young Sub Bae and Nate Bauernfeind and freshman Lawrence Tan, competing as the "Tartans," earned their trip to Japan and the so-called "Battle of the Brains" by placing second among 116 teams from 64 schools Saturday during a regional competition at the University of Cincinnati.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 14, 2006
The Human-Computer Interaction Institute's Bonnie John will face-off against some of the world's most unusable and mis-designed products in the Usability Game Show, hosted today by MAYA Design on the South Side to mark World Usability Day.John will be part of a team of experts that will critique lousy products and offer recommendations for improvement. A panel of celebrity judges, including fellow HCII professor Brad A. Myers, will then decide who wins.The contest will be from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the MAYA offices in the Southside Works, 2629 E.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday November 10, 2006
Carnegie Mellon's School of Computer Science is fielding two teams at tomorrow's regional competitions in the 31st ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest. The teams of three students each will pit their skills against others in the east central division at the University of Cincinnati. The competition calls for the students to use their programming skills to solve complex, real-world problems within a grueling five-hour deadline.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 06, 2006
The Heinz Endowments has awarded $400,000 to Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science to launch Project Olympus, a new initiative to chart exciting directions for the next generation of computing. The project, directed by Distinguished Career Professor of Computer Science Lenore Blum, is designed to bring the university's researchers together with innovators at major technology companies in the Pittsburgh area, such as Seagate, Google, Microsoft, Apple and Intel.

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