SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 16, 2006
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a four-year, $1.1 million grant to six Carnegie Mellon researchers who will develop technologies enabling people to more effectively control privacy and security options available in mobile and pervasive computing environments that range from cell phones to smart offices.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 09, 2006
PITTSBURGH—A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, NASA's Ames Research Center and Google will be honored by the Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose, Calif., for their work on the Global Connection Project, a joint software development effort that has helped rescue workers respond to natural disasters. The Tech Museum Awards, which recognize innovative uses of technology that help solve global challenges, will be presented during a Nov. 15 black-tie gala at the museum.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 02, 2006
PITTSBURGH— Carnegie Mellon University's Tartan Racing team is one of 11 teams that will receive technology development funds from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to help prepare for the agency's Urban Challenge event for autonomous vehicles.Each of the 11 "track A" teams will receive up to $1 million from DARPA, with monies paid out in increments as the teams achieve milestones over the next year.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 27, 2006
Latanya Sweeney, associate professor of computer science, technology and policy, will be inducted this fall as a Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 27, 2006
Officials from Sandia National Laboratories joined SCS Dean Randal E. Bryant on Wednesday to name Boris Sofman, a second-year graduate student in the Robotics Institute, as the first Sandia National Laboratories/Carnegie Mellon University Excellence in Computing Fellow."Boris Sofman is an excellent choice for this honor," said Matthew T. Mason, director of the Robotics Institute. "Boris's work on robot navigation using machine learning techniques just won a prestigious best student paper prize" at the Robotics: Science and Systems conference.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 27, 2006
Manuela Veloso, professor of computer science, is spending her sabbatical year as one of 50 fellows at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University.Veloso was selected from a pool of more than 700 applicants for the highly competitive fellowship program, now in its sixth year. She is one of 14 scientists who have joined 16 humanists, 10 creative artists and 10 social scientists as fellows this academic year.Each fellow works individually and across disciplines on projects during the year-long residency.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 26, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon Associate Professor of Computer Science Seth Goldstein will co-present a class, lab and demonstrations of claytronics, the technology underlying Intel's work in Dynamic Physical Rendering (DPR), at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) in San Francisco, Sept. 26-28. The IDF is described as one of the world's premier technology events, attracting professionals and companies who are actively promoting new directions in technology.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 19, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Luis von Ahn, a Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist who has been named a 2006 recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation "genius grant," has invented an online, multiple-player game that could help make the Internet more accessible to the visually impaired. The game, called Phetch, is an Internet scavenger hunt available at www.peekaboom.org/phetch in which players use a search engine to look for images that fit certain descriptions. In the process, the players produce and verify captions for unlabeled images from the Web.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday September 19, 2006
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation has named Carnegie Mellon University's Luis von Ahn as one of 25 new MacArthur Fellows for 2006.Von Ahn, assistant professor of computer science, received a phone call Sept.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday September 14, 2006
PITTSBURGH—More than 1,000 scientists from around the world will explore the myriad ways in which people and computers use and understand the spoken word when they meet here for Interspeech 2006, the Ninth International Conference on Spoken Language Processing. The conference, one of two major scientific meetings on speech processing held each year, will take place Sept. 17-21 at the Westin Convention Center.

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