SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 16, 2004
PITTSBURGH—More than 50 members of the international press will visit Pittsburgh June 16-18 to attend the international press launch of 20th Century FOX's feature film "I, ROBOT." The film is scheduled for release in July.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday June 10, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Matthew T. Mason, professor of computer science and robotics and a world-renowned expert in robotic manipulation, has been named director of Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute in the School of Computer Science (SCS), effective July 1, 2004. He succeeds Chuck Thorpe, who is moving on to become dean of Carnegie Mellon's campus in Doha, Qatar. A native of Oklahoma City, Mason earned his bachelor's, master's and doctor's degrees in computer science and artificial intelligence from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976, 1978 and 1982, respectively.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 09, 2004
Mark Kamlet
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 14, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Devin Balkcom, a student in Carnegie Mellon University's doctoral program in robotics, was looking for a challenge when he decided to develop the world's first origami-folding robot as the subject of his thesis. Origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper sculpture, looks deceptively simple at first glance. "It's something we humans can do well, but we don't understand the mechanical details," said Balkcom.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday May 14, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Randal E. Bryant, President's Professor of computer science and the newly appointed dean of Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science, has been named a University Professor, the highest academic distinction faculty members can achieve at the university. He is one of three faculty to be named university professors this year. The others are Joel E. Tarr, Caliguiri professor of history in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, J. C.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 15, 2004
PITTSBURGH—Teams of Carnegie Mellon University students will compete for more than $2,000 in cash prizes as they race small autonomous robots they've designed and built on a torturous, 255-foot-long, downhill course in the School of Computer Science 10th annual Mobot Slalom Race. (Mobot=MObile roBOT) The Mobots must find their way along a marked path on the paved sidewalk beside the front entrance to Wean Hall on the Carnegie Mellon campus. There are several forks in the pathway where they must make decisions about which direction to take to reach the finish line.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 07, 2004
WASHINGTON, D.C.— April 5, 2004— Today, National LambdaRail, Inc. (NLR), a consortium of leading U.S. research universities and private sector technology companies, announced that it has appointed Carnegie Mellon University Distinguished Professor David J. Farber as Chief Scientist. In this role, Farber will coordinate the overall research agenda of the organization as well as serve as a key public spokesperson for that agenda. He will report directly to NLR CEO, Tom West.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 01, 2004
PITTSBURGH--Sara Kiesler, professor of human-computer interaction in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS), has been named to the Hillman Professorship in Computer Science, a chaired professorship created in 1986 through the Hillman Foundation, Inc., to attract the best and brightest faculty to SCS. The Hillman Professorship was previously held by Dana S. Scott, one of the world's most distinguished researchers on the logical foundations of programming. Scott became an emeritus professor last year.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday March 16, 2004
PITTSBURGH---Randal E. Bryant, the Robert Mehrabian Professor ofComputer Science and head of the Computer Science Department in CarnegieMellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS), has been nameddean of the college, effective April 1.He succeeds James H. Morris, who will step down as dean to pursue otherduties at the university, including greater involvement in CarnegieMellon's West Coast Campus. Morris had served as dean of SCS since1999.Bryant has been a member of the SCS faculty since 1984.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 15, 2004
BARSTOW, Calif.—Sandstorm, the autonomous robot vehicle developed by Carnegie Mellon University's Red Team to compete in the DARPA Grand Challenge, traveled 7.4 miles into the desert near Barstow, Calif., setting a record for distance before hanging up on a trail in the mountains. It was one of 15 robotic vehicles given the okay by DARPA to attempt to traverse a 142-mile course from Barstow to Primm, Nevada for a $1 million prize. Sandstorm was coming off of a switchback when it high-centered on the berm of a road.

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