SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday December 09, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University robotics researcher Vladimir Brajovic has developed a tool that automatically improves the appearance of darkened or underexposed photographs by digitally adding light to dark areas. The Shadow Illuminator, funded through a $350,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, was developed originally to help robots see better. Using principles based on the physics of how optical images are formed, Shadow Illuminator imitates the vision processes that take place in the human eye.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday November 26, 2003
PITTSBURGH -- A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon, the University ofPennsylvania and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) won the 2003Gordon Bell Prize, one of high performance computing's most prestigiousawards.The team was honored for developing earthquake computer simulations thatplay an important role in reducing seismic risk.The Quake Project's large scale model calculations and computer animationshave pushed the capability of existing hardware and software systems."The Bell Prize recognized our recent Los Angeles Basin earthquakesimulations on PSC's 3000-processo
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday November 18, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) has received a $400,000, three-year grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to fund a program aimed at increasing the number of women studying computer science at the graduate level.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday November 10, 2003
PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University will induct four famous robots into its newly established Robot Hall of Fame at 8 p.m., this evening, at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday October 27, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University will induct four robots into its newly established Robot Hall of Fame™ in a ceremony at Pittsburgh's Carnegie Science Center at 8 p.m. Monday, November 10.The robots to be honored fall into two categories—robots from science and robots from science fiction.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 17, 2003
PITTSBURGH, PA. -- Carnegie Software Partners LLC, a new Carnegie Mellon University spin-off company, has been launched to commercialize technology developed by researchers at the Language Technologies Institute at Carnegie Mellon. This technology will be applied in the defense, intelligence, homeland security and law enforcement sectors.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday October 14, 2003
Mountain View, Calif. - October 13, 2003 - The Computer History Museum today announced that computer industry pioneer, Gordon Bell, will be inducted as a Fellow of the Museum at the annual Computer History Museum Fellow Awards Celebration to be held at 6 p.m., Tuesday, October 21, at the Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Drive in Mountain View, Calif.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday October 08, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University scientist Robert Murphy has received $2.5 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of a five-year, $9.4 million multi-institutional grant headquartered at the University of California, Santa Barbara. This grant for "Next-Generation Bio-Molecular Imaging and Information Discovery" was one of eight large grants made this year by NSF's Information Technology Research Program (see www.engineering.ucsb.edu).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday October 03, 2003
PITTSBURGH—A team of Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers has received a $6 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to enhance an intelligent, automated Reading Tutor that listens to children read and verbally assists them when it hears them stumble.The Reading Tutor displays stories on a computer screen, uses a speech recognizer to listen to children as they read aloud, and responds when necessary with spoken and graphical assistance.The four-year grant will be used to improve and integrate speech and user modeling technologies in th
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday September 24, 2003
PITTSBURGH—The National Science Foundation (NSF) has made a $7.5 million grant to a collaboration of scientists to lay the groundwork for a new, glass fiber-based wireless telecommunications network that will bring reliable, high-speed Internet access to every home and small business in America within the next few years. The five-year grant for the "100 Megabits to 100 Million Homes" project" was made under NSF's Information Technology Research (ITR) Program, and is one of eight large grants made from that program this year. The collaboration includes researchers from Carnegie M

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