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SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday March 05, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Randal E. Bryant, the President's Professor of Computer Science and head of the Computer Science Department in Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS), has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), Membership in NAE honors people who have made important contributions to engineering theory and practice and who have demonstrated unusual accomplishments in pioneering new and developing fields of technology.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 13, 2003
The SCS community gathered at UPMC Sportsworks Feb. 6 to honor outstanding members of its student body, staff and faculty. Two teams of SCS researchers received the School's Allen Newell Award for Research Excellence--the first group for developing the Informedia Digital Library project, which "virtually established the field of video information extraction," and the second for Project LISTEN, a computerized reading tutor that listens to children read and verbally prompts them when they stumble.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday February 12, 2003
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon researchers have developed a system that increases the accuracy of face recognition by computer. After a slow start in the 1970s, interest and progress in face recognition technology has exploded recently as applications in multi-media began to emerge in the 1990s and exploded as its role in security applications since Sept. 11, 2001. began to attract international attention.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday January 31, 2003
PITTSBURGH--Join your friends from the School of Computer Science at the University Center, from 4-11 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 8, as they celebrate SCS Day. The event will feature multi-talented SCS students, staff and faculty who will show and share their expertise in music, dance, juggling, art, gaming and other forms of entertainment.The day will include a series of workshops, an art exhibition, a chess competition and a talent show, with SCS Dean James H. Morris as master of ceremonies.Registration for the workshops runs from 11am - 5pm, Feb.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday December 09, 2002
MOFFETT FIELD, CALIF.—Carnegie Mellon University will host a Founders' Day celebration to honor Silicon Valley leaders who together have donated more than $1 million to support the establishment of the university's new West Coast campus. The event will take place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. PST, Tuesday, December 10, in Building 17 of the Shenandoah Plaza at Moffett Field where the campus is located.More than 20 donors will be honored, including some of Silicon Valley's most famous entrepreneurs.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday July 31, 2002
PITTSBURGH—A socially skilled talking robot named Grace, built by a team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Metrica, Inc., Northwestern University and Swarthmore College, will participate in the American Association for Artificial Intelligence annual Robot Challenge Wednesday, July 31, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.The event is part of the 18th National Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-2002) that started on July 28 and lasts through Aug. 1. (See www.aaai.org).
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 25, 2002
MOFFETT FIELD, CALIF.--Thirty San Francisco Bay Area high school students entering their senior year this fall will soon participate in a new robotic summer course offered by Carnegie Mellon University at its West Coast Campus at Moffett Field, Calif. The course is being offered in collaboration with NASA's Ames Research Center and the National Hispanic University at San Jose, Calif. Students in the "Robotic Autonomy" program will build, program and operate their own vision-based, mobile robots as they learn about the electronics, mechanics and computer science of robotic systems.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday May 01, 2002
Manuel Blum, Carnegie Mellon University's Bruce Nelson professor of computer science, and a leader in the world oftheoretical computing, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors that can be accorded to a U.S. scientist or engineer.Blum is one of the founders of computational complexity theory, work that has also had applications to cryptography andprogram checking. He came to Carnegie Mellon as a visiting professor in 1999 after a distinguished career at theUniversity of California at Berkeley where he received an A.M.

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