SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday April 17, 2006
PITTSBURGH—The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences has selected John R. Anderson, the Richard King Mellon Professor of Psychology and Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, as the recipient of the inaugural Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science.The Heineken Prize for Cognitive Science, which carries a $150,000 award, is one of six prizes that are awarded every two years by the Alfred Heineken Fondsen Foundation to outstanding researchers selected by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 13, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Computers were crude, number-crunching machines when the then-Carnegie Institute of Technology installed its first electronic computer in the summer of 1956. But professors Herbert Simon and Allen Newell already had figured out how to make them think.Their invention, the first artificially intelligent computer program, only scratched the surface of the computer's potential.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 13, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Computers can store more information and the Internet can transmit that information faster than humans can comprehend, so meshing the computer's capabilities with human needs has long been a concern of Carnegie Mellon University scientists.In recognition of these challenges and the broader issues of how people use telephones, appliances and other increasingly complex technologies, the Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) was founded in 1994.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday April 07, 2006
See also.You could call it a "Tale of Two Buildings."Initial designs for the new Gates Center for Computer Science were introduced to the university community last week, revealing not one but two contemporary structures that will make up the new home for the School of Computer Science (SCS).Mack Scogin, principal of the Atlanta-based Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects Inc., gave a preview of plans for the new center during a School of Architecture-sponsored lecture at the Carnegie Museum Lecture Hall on April 3 and an
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 30, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) is extending its leadership in the burgeoning field of machine learning by creating the nation's first Machine Learning Department.The new department designation for what was formerly known as the Center for Automated Learning and Discovery (CALD) reflects the importance of machine learning in such growing areas as data mining and sensor networks, as well as a commitment by the university to continue its pioneering efforts in the field.Tom M.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 23, 2006
The university is renovating part of an old locomotive roundhouse on the future Robot City site to serve as the home for the Red Team and elements of the Field Robotics Center. William "Red" Whittaker hopes to turn the former LTV site into Robot City. The robots once housed in the Planetary Robotics Building — including the Red Team and its famed robotic race vehicles — have moved to new quarters on the former LTV site in Hazelwood.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday March 06, 2006
EVENT: Carnegie Mellon University and Electronic Arts Inc. (EA) will announce a groundbreaking collaboration that can revolutionize how computer programming is taught in the U.S. With input from EA, Carnegie Mellon's popular Alice programming software (www.alice.org), currently used at 100 high schools and universities in the U.S., will reach new levels of visual excitement and usability, especially among young women and minorities.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday February 23, 2006
PITTSBURGH—Scientists at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that our ears use the most efficient way to process the sounds we hear, from babbling brooks to wailing babies. These results represent a significant advance in understanding how sound is encoded for transmission to the brain, according to the authors, whose work is published with an accompanying "News and Views" editorial in the Feb. 23 issue of Nature.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday February 14, 2006
Manuel Blum, SCS' Bruce Nelson professor of computer science, and Pradeep K. Khosla, dean of the college of engineering and Philip and Marsha Dowd professor of engineering and robotics, are two of five Carnegie Mellon University professors who have been elected this year to the National Academy of Engineering. The others include Christina H. Amon, Egon Balas, and Krzysztof A. Matyjaszewski.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday February 10, 2006
PITTSBURGH— Carnegie Mellon University professors Cristina H. Amon, Egon Balas, Manuel Blum, Pradeep K. Khosla and Krzysztof A. Matyjaszewski have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). Membership in the NAE honors people who have made important contributions to engineering theory and practice and who have demonstrated unusual accomplishments in pioneering new and developing fields of technology. It is one of the highest professional distinctions an engineer can achieve.

Pages

Subscribe to SCS News