SCS News & Press Releases

By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday May 04, 2000
PITTSBURGH- Thirty-two fifth graders from the Holy Rosary Elementary School in Pittsburgh's Homewood section will be the stars of a poetry reading at Carnegie Mellon University's Purnell Center for the Arts to showcase how they've enhanced their speaking skills.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday April 20, 2000
PITTSBURGH- Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute, in cooperation with the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, will host the first Workshop on Interactive Robotics and Entertainment (WIRE 2000), April 30 to May 1 on the university campus. For the first time, experts in interactive robotics from academia and industry will share the podium with strategists and seers from the toy industry--estimated at more than $28 billion in the U.S. alone--to analyze the growing interaction between their fields and predict how it will change both areas in the future.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday April 12, 2000
PITTSBURGH- More than a dozen teams of Carnegie Mellon University students from engineering, robotics and computer science are fine tuning the autonomous mini robots they've built to compete at Noon, Friday, April 14, in the university's annual Mobot Slalom race, which will net the winner a $1,000 grand prize.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday March 30, 2000
PITTSBURGH-As part of its centennial celebration, Carnegie Mellon University will host a day-long symposium honoring the contributions of Angel G. Jordan, emeritus university professor of electrical and computer engineering and robotics, whose illustrious career has paralleled the advance of the university for almost 50 years.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Friday January 14, 2000
PITTSBURGH--Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have deployed a four-wheeled robot named Nomad to a site in Antarctica, where it will autonomously search for meteorites and classify them in the field with scientific instruments contained in a newly developed manipulator arm. The expedition marks the first time a robot will be used to discover extraterrestrial material that has fallen to Earth and could serve as a prototype for future scientific missions to Mars and the Moon.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday January 11, 2000
PITTSBURGH--Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Automated Learning and Discovery (CALD), which focuses on data mining research, has received a $560,000 gift of equipment from IBM Corp., a corporate member of the center. The equipment includes workstations, computer servers, a one-terabyte "RAID (redundant arrays of independent disks) storage device and an expandable tape-cartridge robot with hundreds of 10-gigabyte tape cartridges and data management software, including DB2 on Linux, and Intelligent Miner.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Monday August 16, 1999
Robotic Applications for the Next Millennium, addressing the task performance of field and service robots, will be the topic of the Second International Conference on Field and Service Robotics--FSR'99 hosted by Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute, August 29-31 on the university campus.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Thursday July 22, 1999
Carnegie Mellon University scientists and their colleagues in the international Consortium for Speech Translation Advanced Research (C-STAR) are conducting an international video conference to demonstrate a travel planning system on the Web, which employs groundbreaking computer speech-to-speech translation technology that can translate among six languages at six different locations around the world.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Wednesday June 02, 1999
PIONEER, a small,bulldozer-like mobile robot, developed in part by Robotics Institute researchers and built by university spinoff RedZone Robotics, Inc., to inspect and assess the interior of the destroyed nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, made its official debut in Ukraine last Thursday.
By 
Byron Spice
 - 
Tuesday June 01, 1999
James H. Morris, the Herbert A. Simon professor of human computer interaction and head of the Computer Science Department since 1992, has been named dean of the School of Computer Science (SCS), effective July 1.Morris, the developer of Carnegie Mellon's Andrew system in the early 1980s, succeeds Raj Reddy, the Herbert A. Simon professor of computer science and robotics and founder of Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute. Reddy will return to research and teaching after seven years at the helm of SCS.

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