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From the latest issue:

Algorithms as Art

BY Jason Togyer - Friday April 30, 2010
Alumnus and faculty installations in the Gates and Hillman Centers draw inspiration from technologyBy Meghan Holohan"Do you want me to stand in the art?" asks Scott Draves (CS'97). He positions himself in front of a large screen in a tiny, dark room at the Michael Berger Gallery on Pittsburgh's South Side. Blobs that resemble miniscule jellyfish pulsate and swirl across his face, highlighting his white shirt. Reds, yellows, greens and blues dance across the screen, tattooing Draves' skin and clothes.  

In the Loop: Lenore Blum

BY Jason Togyer - Friday April 30, 2010
Lenore Blum is Distinguished Career Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. As an undergraduate at Carnegie Tech, she took academic computing with Alan Perlis, and earned her doctorate in mathematics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  

Research Notebook

BY Jason Togyer - Friday April 30, 2010
The Rise of the Expert Amateur: Citizen Science and Neo-VolunteerismBy Eric PaulosIf you cannot measure it, you cannot improve it. -- Lord KelvinIn the Living Environments Lab, we conduct research focused on societal problems. More specifically, we focus on the critical intersection of human life, our living planet and technology. 

Then and Now: Web Extra

BY Jason Togyer - Wednesday April 28, 2010
Though he wasn't a member of the computer science faculty, Carnegie Mellon Professor Clarence Zener had a profound effect on the design of digital computers and the algorithms they employ.In 1934, while at Princeton, Zener discovered that certain electrical insulating materials--semiconductors--were able to regulate and limit voltage. That led to the invention 20 years later of Zener diodes, tiny solid-state voltage regulators that made reliable desktop computers a reality. 

Web Extra: Clarence Zener, A Rare, Strange Genius

BY Jason Togyer - Monday March 29, 2010
From Carnegie-Mellon Magazine, Winter 1985, pp. 18-19by Matthew Maguire Clarence Zener first encountered physics more than half a century ago as a youngster thumbing through the child's "Book of Knowledge." "I was hep on physics from the very beginning," he admits.  

Dean's Message: An Exciting Few Months

BY Randy Bryant - Thursday December 17, 2009
After more than five years of planning, design and construction, many faculty and staff of the School of Computer Science moved into their new offices in the Gates Center for Computer Science and the Hillman Center for Future-Generation Technologies, just before the fall semester began.  

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