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Xing Named 2016 AAAI Fellow

Byron Spice Wednesday February 10, 2016
The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence has elected Eric P. Xing, professor of machine learning and director of the Center for Machine Learning and Health, one of six 2016 AAAI fellows.The new class of fellows will be recognized at a dinner Sunday, Feb. 14, during the annual AAAI conference in Phoenix. Xing joins 17 current or former CMU faculty members previously named AAAI fellows.The fellows program recognizes individuals who have made significant, sustained contributions to the AI field. Xing was cited "for significant contributions to statistical machine learning,... 

CMU's CHIMP Featured on NOVA's "Rise of the Robots"

Byron Spice Tuesday February 09, 2016
Carnegie Mellon's Tartan Rescue Team and its CHIMP robot are featured in "Rise of the Robots," the Feb. 24 episode of PBS's NOVA.The episode of the long-running science series looks at the current state of robots with human-like capabilities and considers the enormous challenges that remain before humanoid robots and semi-humanoids such as CHIMP are ready to become part of our everyday lives.Much of the episode revolves around the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Robotics Challenge, in which CHIMP and 23 of the world's most advanced robots attempted to perform a series of... 

Scientists' Robotically Driven System Could Reduce Cost of Discovering Drug and Target Interactions

Emily Packer (eLife) and Byron Spice (CMU) Tuesday February 09, 2016
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have created the first robotically driven experimentation system to determine the effects of a large number of drugs on many proteins, reducing the number of necessary experiments by 70 percent.The model, presented in the journal eLife, uses an approach that could lead to accurate predictions of the interactions between novel drugs and their targets, helping reduce the cost of drug discovery."Biomedical scientists have invested a lot of effort in making it easier to perform numerous experiments quickly and cheaply," said lead author Armaghan Naik, a Lane... 

Search Technique Helps Researchers Find DNA Sequences in Minutes Rather Than Days

Byron Spice Monday February 08, 2016
Database searches for DNA sequences that can take biologists and medical researchers days can now be completed in a matter of minutes, thanks to a new search method developed by computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University.The method developed by Carl Kingsford, associate professor of computational biology, and Brad Solomon, a Ph.D. student in the Computational Biology Department, is designed for searching so-called "short reads" — DNA and RNA sequences generated by high-throughput sequencing techniques. It relies on a new indexing data structure, called Sequence Bloom Trees (SBTs), that... 

Kraut Earns 2016 SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement in Research Award

Susie Cribbs Friday February 05, 2016
Herbert A. Simon Professor of Human-Computer Interaction Robert Kraut has been named the recipient of the 2016 SIGCHI Lifetime Achievement in Research Award. Presented annually by the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction, the award recognizes an individual for the very best, most fundamental and influential research contributions to the human-computer interaction field. According to SIGCHI, "It is awarded for a lifetime of innovation and leadership."A founding member of Carnegie Mellon University's Human-Computer Interaction Institute (... 

Giving a Hand to Those in Need

Susie Cribbs Thursday February 04, 2016
Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science aims to change the world — the planet and its people — for the better by the year 2040. A team of Human-Computer Interaction Institute researchers has joined with colleagues at CMU and other organizations to do just that by improving how assistive technologies like prosthetic hands are fabricated and distributed.A professionally made prosthetic hand can cost between $6,000 and $10,000. But a global network of volunteer makers called e-NABLE uses relatively affordable 3D printing technology to produce simple mechanical prosthetic hands... 

Carnegie Mellon Joins IARPA Project To Reverse-Engineer Brain Algorithms

Byron Spice Wednesday February 03, 2016
Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans.The research project, led by Tai Sing Lee, a professor in the Computer Science Department and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC), is funded by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) through its Machine Intelligence From Cortical Networks (MICrONS) research program. MICrONS is... 

White House CTO Ed Felten To Address Latest Privacy Concerns at Carnegie Mellon's Privacy Day

Daniel Tkacik Monday January 25, 2016
Ed Felten, the Deputy U.S. Chief Technology Officer for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, will be this year's keynote speaker at Carnegie Mellon University's Privacy Day celebration on Thursday, Jan. 28."Ed is at the center of the privacy policy debate at a time when technology development and security imperatives are requiring society to ask itself some really tough questions," said Norman Sadeh, a professor in the School of Computer Science and co-director of Carnegie Mellon's Privacy Engineering program. "I could not think of a better keynote speaker for our Privacy...